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Title: The modulation of canine mesenchymal stem cells by nano-topographic cues

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising cellular therapeutic for the treatment of a variety of disorders. On transplantation, MSCs interact with diverse extracellular matrices (ECMs) that vary dramatically in topographic feature type, size and surface order. In order to investigate the impact of these topographic cues, surfaces were fabricated with either isotropically ordered holes or anisotropically ordered ridges and grooves. To simulate the biologically relevant nano through micron size scale, a series of topographically patterned substrates possessing features of differing pitch (pitch=feature width+groove width) were created. Results document that the surface order and size of substratum topographic features dramatically modulate fundamental MSC behaviors. Topographically patterned (ridge+groove) surfaces were found to significantly impact MSC alignment, elongation, and aspect ratio. Novel findings also demonstrate that submicron surfaces patterned with holes resulted in increased MSC alignment to adjacent cells as well as increased migration rates. Overall, this study demonstrates that the presentation of substratum topographic cues dramatically influence MSC behaviors in a size and shape dependent manner. The response of MSCs to substratum topographic cues was similar to other cell types that have been studied previously with regards to cell shape on ridge and groove surfaces but differed with respect to proliferationmore » and migration. This is the first study to compare the impact of anisotropically ordered ridge and groove topographic cues to isotropically order holed topographic cues on fundamental MSC behaviors across a range of biologically relevant size scales.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [4]
  1. Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis (United States)
  2. Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis (United States)
  3. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
  4. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22212616
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Experimental Cell Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 318; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0014-4827
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ASPECT RATIO; CELL PROLIFERATION; DOGS; STEM CELLS; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Wood, Joshua A., Ly, Irene, Borjesson, Dori L., Nealey, Paul F., Russell, Paul, Murphy, Christopher J., E-mail: cjmurphy@ucdavis.edu, and Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis. The modulation of canine mesenchymal stem cells by nano-topographic cues. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2012.06.022.
Wood, Joshua A., Ly, Irene, Borjesson, Dori L., Nealey, Paul F., Russell, Paul, Murphy, Christopher J., E-mail: cjmurphy@ucdavis.edu, & Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis. The modulation of canine mesenchymal stem cells by nano-topographic cues. United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2012.06.022.
Wood, Joshua A., Ly, Irene, Borjesson, Dori L., Nealey, Paul F., Russell, Paul, Murphy, Christopher J., E-mail: cjmurphy@ucdavis.edu, and Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis. Thu . "The modulation of canine mesenchymal stem cells by nano-topographic cues". United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2012.06.022.
@article{osti_22212616,
title = {The modulation of canine mesenchymal stem cells by nano-topographic cues},
author = {Wood, Joshua A. and Ly, Irene and Borjesson, Dori L. and Nealey, Paul F. and Russell, Paul and Murphy, Christopher J., E-mail: cjmurphy@ucdavis.edu and Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis},
abstractNote = {Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising cellular therapeutic for the treatment of a variety of disorders. On transplantation, MSCs interact with diverse extracellular matrices (ECMs) that vary dramatically in topographic feature type, size and surface order. In order to investigate the impact of these topographic cues, surfaces were fabricated with either isotropically ordered holes or anisotropically ordered ridges and grooves. To simulate the biologically relevant nano through micron size scale, a series of topographically patterned substrates possessing features of differing pitch (pitch=feature width+groove width) were created. Results document that the surface order and size of substratum topographic features dramatically modulate fundamental MSC behaviors. Topographically patterned (ridge+groove) surfaces were found to significantly impact MSC alignment, elongation, and aspect ratio. Novel findings also demonstrate that submicron surfaces patterned with holes resulted in increased MSC alignment to adjacent cells as well as increased migration rates. Overall, this study demonstrates that the presentation of substratum topographic cues dramatically influence MSC behaviors in a size and shape dependent manner. The response of MSCs to substratum topographic cues was similar to other cell types that have been studied previously with regards to cell shape on ridge and groove surfaces but differed with respect to proliferation and migration. This is the first study to compare the impact of anisotropically ordered ridge and groove topographic cues to isotropically order holed topographic cues on fundamental MSC behaviors across a range of biologically relevant size scales.},
doi = {10.1016/J.YEXCR.2012.06.022},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research},
issn = {0014-4827},
number = 19,
volume = 318,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}