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Title: Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

Abstract

Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22212138
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Cell Research; Journal Volume: 317; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; CELL PROLIFERATION; FEEDBACK; MORPHOGENESIS; NEOPLASMS; ONTOGENESIS; SYMMETRY BREAKING

Citation Formats

Kumar, Girish, Chen, Bo, Co, Carlos C., and Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2011.02.009.
Kumar, Girish, Chen, Bo, Co, Carlos C., & Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters. United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2011.02.009.
Kumar, Girish, Chen, Bo, Co, Carlos C., and Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu. Fri . "Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters". United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2011.02.009.
@article{osti_22212138,
title = {Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters},
author = {Kumar, Girish and Chen, Bo and Co, Carlos C. and Ho, Chia-Chi, E-mail: hocc@email.uc.edu},
abstractNote = {Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.YEXCR.2011.02.009},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research},
number = 10,
volume = 317,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 10 00:00:00 EDT 2011},
month = {Fri Jun 10 00:00:00 EDT 2011}
}
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