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Title: In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells

Abstract

Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)
  2. (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22209903
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Experimental Cell Research; Journal Volume: 316; Journal Issue: 16; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DRUGS; FAILURES; IN VITRO; KIDNEYS; MICE; PATIENTS; STEM CELLS; THERAPY

Citation Formats

Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp, PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, and JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2010.04.034.
Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp, PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, & JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells. United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2010.04.034.
Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp, PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, and JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency. 2010. "In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells". United States. doi:10.1016/J.YEXCR.2010.04.034.
@article{osti_22209903,
title = {In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells},
author = {Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp and PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency and JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency},
abstractNote = {Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.},
doi = {10.1016/J.YEXCR.2010.04.034},
journal = {Experimental Cell Research},
number = 16,
volume = 316,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month =
}
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  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth ofmore » undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.« less
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