skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate blood pressure changes caused by deployment of the Surefire antireflux expandable tip. The pressure measurements are relevant because they imply changes in hepatoenteric arterial blood flow within this liver compartment during hepatic artery delivery of cytotoxic agents. Methods: After positioning the Surefire antireflux system in the targeted hepatic artery, blood pressure was obtained initially with the tip collapsed (or through a femoral artery sheath), then again after the tip was expanded before chemoembolization or yttrium 90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization. Results: Eighteen patients with liver malignancy underwent 29 procedures in 29 hepatic arteries (3 common hepatic, 22 lobar, 4 segmental). Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure were all decreased by a mean of 29 mm Hg (p = 0.000004), 14 mm Hg (p = 0.0000004), and 22 mm Hg (p = 0.00000001), respectively. Conclusion: When the Surefire expandable tip is deployed to prevent retrograde reflux of agents, it also results in a significant decrease in blood pressure in the antegrade distribution, potentially resulting in hepatopedal blood flow in vessels that are difficult to embolize, such as the supraduodenal arteries.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. University of California, San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Radiology 8756, UCSD Medical Center (United States)
  2. Surefire Medical, Inc. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22208022
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); http://www.springer-ny.com; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ARTERIES; BLOOD FLOW; BLOOD PRESSURE; LIVER; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PRESSURE MEASUREMENT; YTTRIUM 90; RADIOEMBOLIZATION

Citation Formats

Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu, Kikolski, Steven G., and Chomas, James E. Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-012-0538-2.
Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu, Kikolski, Steven G., & Chomas, James E. Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-012-0538-2.
Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu, Kikolski, Steven G., and Chomas, James E. Tue . "Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-012-0538-2.
@article{osti_22208022,
title = {Downstream Hepatic Arterial Blood Pressure Changes Caused by Deployment of the Surefire AntiReflux Expandable Tip},
author = {Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu and Kikolski, Steven G. and Chomas, James E.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate blood pressure changes caused by deployment of the Surefire antireflux expandable tip. The pressure measurements are relevant because they imply changes in hepatoenteric arterial blood flow within this liver compartment during hepatic artery delivery of cytotoxic agents. Methods: After positioning the Surefire antireflux system in the targeted hepatic artery, blood pressure was obtained initially with the tip collapsed (or through a femoral artery sheath), then again after the tip was expanded before chemoembolization or yttrium 90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization. Results: Eighteen patients with liver malignancy underwent 29 procedures in 29 hepatic arteries (3 common hepatic, 22 lobar, 4 segmental). Systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure were all decreased by a mean of 29 mm Hg (p = 0.000004), 14 mm Hg (p = 0.0000004), and 22 mm Hg (p = 0.00000001), respectively. Conclusion: When the Surefire expandable tip is deployed to prevent retrograde reflux of agents, it also results in a significant decrease in blood pressure in the antegrade distribution, potentially resulting in hepatopedal blood flow in vessels that are difficult to embolize, such as the supraduodenal arteries.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-012-0538-2},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 5,
volume = 36,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 15 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Tue Oct 15 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
  • Changes in the distribution of the hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II (AT-II) were studied in human hepatic cancers using extremely short-lived radioisotope (RI) (krypton 81 m (/sup 81m/Kr); half-life, 13 seconds). After the start of continuous infusion of AT-II, the radioactivity of the tumor showed about a two-fold increase, whereas that of the nontumor region decreased to about one half as much as the level before the infusion. Consequently, the mean ratio of the arterial blood flow in the tumor region to that in the nontumor region (T/N ratio) increased to 3.30 (P less thanmore » 0.001). The T/N ratio showed a peak before the peripheral blood pressure reached the maximum, and thereafter tended to decrease. Intra-arterial infusion of AT-II raised the T/N ratio more obviously than did intravenous infusion of the drug, with less rise in the peripheral blood pressure. It is believed that intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with local use of AT-II enables better accessibility of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors.« less
  • Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign Cmore » saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate changes in distribution of hepatic arterial blood flow in the liver following insertion of an uncovered stent and subsequently a stent-graft in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) channel.Methods: The experiments were performed in eight healthy pigs under general anesthesia. In a pilot study in one pig, scintigraphic evaluation of arterial perfusion to the liver was done before and after inflation of a balloon in the right hepatic vein. In the other pigs, outflow from the right liver vein was checked repeatedly by contrast injection through a percutaneously inserted catheter. The arterial perfusion through the liver wasmore » examined by scintigraphy, following selective injection of macro-aggregate of 99Tcm-labeled human serum albumin 99Tcm-HSA) into the hepatic artery. This examination was done before and after creation of a TIPS with an uncovered stent and subsequently after insertion of a covered stent-graft into the cranial portion of the shunt channel. Results: In the pilot study changes in the arterial perfusion to the liver were easily detectable by scintigraphy. One pig died during the procedure and another pig was excluded due to dislodgement of the hepatic artery catheter. The inserted covered stent obstructed venous outflow from part of the right liver lobe. The 99Tcm-HSA activity in this part remained unchanged after TIPS creation with an uncovered stent. A reduction in activity was seen after insertion of a stent-graft (p0.06).Conclusion: The distribution of the hepaticarterial blood flow is affected by creation of a TIPS with a stent-graft, in the experimental pig model.« less
  • Acute experiments were done in cats and chronic experiments in dogs. The cats were subjected to whole-body x irradiation with a dose of 1500 r, and were examined on the third day after irradiation, when radiation disease was fully developed. Reflexes from the baro- and chemoreceptors were investigated, and arterial blood pressure was recorded in the irradiated cats after intravenous administration of adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, acetylcholine, histamine, Regitine, atropine, or Pendiomid. Dogs were subjected to whole-body irradiation with 800 r,; changes in arterial blood pressure, which occurred after the administration of neurohormones, were investigated before and after irradiation. Pressor reflexesmore » in irradiated cats, elicited by clamping and unclamping of both common carotid arteries, corresponded to a rise from 129.6 to 141.4 mm Hg, as compared to pressor reflexes in nonirradiated cats from 106.6 to 146. Reflexes from carotid sinus chemoreceptors evoked by 0.5% KCl were also weaker in irradiated cats. The results of both the acute and chronic experiments indicate that circulatory changes occur in radiation disease. The changes mainly involve responses of the circulatory system to neurohormones and stimulation of vascular baro- and chemoreceptors. (TCO)« less
  • Purpose: In the presence of variant hepatic arterial anatomy, obtaining whole-liver coverage with yttrium 90 (Y90) radioembolization may be challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a technique whereby variant hepatic arterial branches are embolized and then Y90 is administered selectively into one remaining hepatic arterial branch results in whole-liver coverage and effective therapy. A retrospective comparison of treatment response was made between a group of patients who underwent this technique before Y90 administration and a group of patients who received standard Y90 administration as a single dose into the proper hepatic artery or in divided dosesmore » into the immediate hepatic artery branches. The rest of the workup and treatment were identical in both groups, including routine embolization of potential nonhepatic, nontarget vessels (e.g., the gastroduodenal artery). Methods: A total of 32 patients (mean age 56.9 years, range 39-77 years) treated with Y90 between June 2004 and March 2008 were analyzed. The primary malignancy was colorectal in 29, breast in 2, and cholangiocarcinoma in 1. Group 1 comprised 20 patients who had no alterations to their hepatic arterial supply. Group 2 comprised 12 cases who had undergone prior embolization of hepatic arterial branches before administration of Y90. The response to treatment was assessed by comparing standardized uptake value (SUV) on the pre- and postprocedure fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic studies of representative lesions within the right and left lobes of the liver. Results: In group 1, significant response (P < 0.001) was seen among right lobe lesions but not among left lobe lesions (P = 0.549). In group 2, there was a significant response among both right (P = 0.028) and left (P = 0.014) lobe lesions. No difference was found in the response of right lobe lesions (P = 0.726) between groups 1 and 2; a significantly greater response was found in group 2 compared to group 1 (P = 0.004) for left lobe lesions. Conclusion: Selective Y90 radioembolization after manipulation of hepatic arterial blood supply leads to an even distribution within the entire liver. When variations in hepatic arterial anatomy exist, this technique allows effective whole-liver radioembolization therapy from a single selective arterial injection.« less