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Title: Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

Abstract

Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGFmore » signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [1]
  1. Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)
  2. Section of Orthodontics, Division of Oral Health, Growth and Development, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)
  3. Section of Periodontology, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)
  4. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)
  5. (JST), CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22204772
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 404; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; CELL PROLIFERATION; FIBROBLASTS; GENES; GROWTH FACTORS; MICE; RNA; TISSUE CULTURES

Citation Formats

Matsumura, Kaori, Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp, Yoshizaki, Keigo, Arai, Shinsaku, Sanui, Terukazu, Yoshiga, Daigo, Yoshimura, Akihiko, Japan Science and Technology Agency, and Nakamura, Seiji. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.12.116.
Matsumura, Kaori, Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp, Yoshizaki, Keigo, Arai, Shinsaku, Sanui, Terukazu, Yoshiga, Daigo, Yoshimura, Akihiko, Japan Science and Technology Agency, & Nakamura, Seiji. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.12.116.
Matsumura, Kaori, Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp, Yoshizaki, Keigo, Arai, Shinsaku, Sanui, Terukazu, Yoshiga, Daigo, Yoshimura, Akihiko, Japan Science and Technology Agency, and Nakamura, Seiji. Fri . "Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.12.116.
@article{osti_22204772,
title = {Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling},
author = {Matsumura, Kaori and Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp and Yoshizaki, Keigo and Arai, Shinsaku and Sanui, Terukazu and Yoshiga, Daigo and Yoshimura, Akihiko and Japan Science and Technology Agency and Nakamura, Seiji},
abstractNote = {Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2010.12.116},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 404,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 28 00:00:00 EST 2011},
month = {Fri Jan 28 00:00:00 EST 2011}
}
  • We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis in HEMP cells, whereas EGF showed no effect on these activities in HEMP-RV cells. Growth of HEMP-RV cells was slightly reduced compared with that of HEMP cells. EGF stimulated growthmore » of HEMP cells and to a lesser extent of HEMP-RV cells. Binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to cell-surface receptors in HEMP-RV cells was, to our surprise, twice as much as that in HEMP cells. However, internalization of bound /sup 125/I-EGF in HEMP-RV cells was profoundly diminished. Thus, persistent RV infection causes not only changes in HEMP cell growth and differentiation but a decrease in or loss of HEMP cell responsiveness to EGF. The effects of persistent RV infection on palatal cell differentiation as well as growth may be responsible for the pathogenesis of congenital rubella. Furthermore, since HEMP cells appear to be closely related to osteoblasts, these results suggest a mechanism for RV-induced osseous abnormalities manifested in congenital rubella patients.« less
  • Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activitymore » and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.« less
  • Adipose-derived mesenchymal cells (AMCs) have demonstrated a great capacity for differentiating into bone, cartilage, and fat. Studies using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMSCs) have shown that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, a potent mitogenic factor, plays an important role in tissue engineering due to its effects in proliferation and differentiation for mesenchymal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of FGF-2 in AMC chondrogenic differentiation and its possible contributions to cell-based therapeutics in skeletal tissue regeneration. Data demonstrated that FGF-2 significantly promoted the proliferation of AMCs and enhanced chondrogenesis in three-dimensional micromass culture. Moreover, priming AMCs withmore » treatment of FGF-2 at 10 ng/ml demonstrated that cells underwent chondrogenic phenotypic differentiation, possibly by inducing N-Cadherin, FGF-receptor 2, and transcription factor Sox9. Our results indicated that FGF-2 potentiates chondrogenesis in AMCs, similar to its functions in BMSCs, suggesting the versatile potential applications of FGF-2 in skeletal regeneration and cartilage repair.« less
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF modulates BMPs pathway in HMSCs by down-regulating BMP/BMPR expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated by ERK and JNK MAPKs pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crosstalk between FGF and BMPs must be taken into account in skeletal bioengineering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It must also be considered in the use of recombinant BMPs in orthopedic and spine surgeries. -- Abstract: Understanding the interactions between growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) signaling remains a crucial issue to optimize the use of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) and BMPs in therapeutic perspectives and bone tissue engineering. BMPs are potent inducers of osteoblastic differentiation. They exertmore » their actions via BMP receptors (BMPR), including BMPR1A, BMPR1B and BMPR2. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is expressed by cells of the osteoblastic lineage, increases their proliferation and is secreted during the healing process of fractures or in surgery bone sites. We hypothesized that FGF2 might influence HMSC osteoblastic differentiation by modulating expressions of BMPs and their receptors. BMP2, BMP4, BMPR1A and mainly BMPR1B expressions were up-regulated during this differentiation. FGF2 inhibited HMSCs osteoblastic differentiation and the up-regulation of BMPs and BMPR. This effect was prevented by inhibiting the ERK or JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases which are known to be activated by FGF2. These data provide a mechanism explaining the inhibitory effect of FGF2 on osteoblastic differentiation of HMSCs. These crosstalks between growth and osteogenic factors should be considered in the use of recombinant BMPs in therapeutic purpose of fracture repair or skeletal bioengineering.« less
  • Highlights: •Nestin expression in C6 glioma cells is induced by FGF-2. •Nestin expression is induced by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. •The FGFR inhibitor SU5402 blocks the FGF-2-induced nestin expression. •The mRNA of FGFR1 and 3 are detected in C6 glioma cells. •Ras–Raf–ERK–Sp1 signaling pathway is responsibe for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. -- Abstract: Nestin is a 240-kDa intermediate filament protein expressed mainly in neural and myogenic stem cells. Although a substantial number of studies have focused on the expression of nestin during development of the central nervous system, little is known about the factors that induce andmore » regulate its expression. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is an effective mitogen and stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of a subset of nestin-expressing cells, including neural progenitor cells, glial precursor cells, and smooth muscle cells. To assess whether FGF-2 is a potent factor that induces the expression of nestin, C6 glioma cells were used. The results showed that nestin expression was up-regulated by FGF-2 via de novo RNA and protein synthesis. Our RT-PCR results showed that C6 glioma cells express FGFR1/3, and FGFRs is required for FGF-2-induced nestin expression. Further signaling analysis also revealed that FGF-2-induced nestin expression is mediated through FGFR–MAPK–ERK signaling axis and the transcriptional factor Sp1. These findings provide new insight into the regulation of nestin in glial system and enable the further studies on the function of nestin in glial cells.« less