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Title: Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Abstract

Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.

Authors:
;  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Molecular Biology Institute, UCLA, 607 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22202343
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 391; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARGININE; ASYMMETRY; METHYL TRANSFERASES; METHYLATION; RIBOSOMES; SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; ZINC

Citation Formats

Lipson, Rebecca S., Webb, Kristofor J., and Clarke, Steven G., E-mail: clarke@mbi.ucla.edu. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.12.112.
Lipson, Rebecca S., Webb, Kristofor J., & Clarke, Steven G., E-mail: clarke@mbi.ucla.edu. Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.12.112.
Lipson, Rebecca S., Webb, Kristofor J., and Clarke, Steven G., E-mail: clarke@mbi.ucla.edu. Fri . "Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.12.112.
@article{osti_22202343,
title = {Rmt1 catalyzes zinc-finger independent arginine methylation of ribosomal protein Rps2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae},
author = {Lipson, Rebecca S. and Webb, Kristofor J. and Clarke, Steven G., E-mail: clarke@mbi.ucla.edu},
abstractNote = {Rps2/rpS2 is a well conserved protein of the eukaryotic ribosomal small subunit. Rps2 has previously been shown to contain asymmetric dimethylarginine residues, the addition of which is catalyzed by zinc-finger-containing arginine methyltransferase 3 (Rmt3) in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and protein arginine methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that despite the lack of a zinc-finger-containing homolog of Rmt3/PRMT3 in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rps2 is partially modified to generate asymmetric dimethylarginine and monomethylarginine residues. We find that this modification of Rps2 is dependent upon the major arginine methyltransferase 1 (Rmt1) in S. cerevisiae. These results are suggestive of a role for Rmt1 in modifying the function of Rps2 in a manner distinct from that occurring in S. pombe and mammalian cells.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.12.112},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 391,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2010},
month = {Fri Jan 22 00:00:00 EST 2010}
}
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