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Title: TAF15 and the leukemia-associated fusion protein TAF15-CIZ/NMP4 are cleaved by caspases-3 and -7

Abstract

Caspases are central players in proteolytic pathways that regulate cellular processes such as apoptosis and differentiation. To accelerate the discovery of novel caspase substrates we developed a method combining in silico screening and in vitro validation. With this approach, we identified TAF15 as a novel caspase substrate in a trial study. We find that TAF15 was specifically cleaved by caspases-3 and -7. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the consensus sequence {sup 106}DQPD/Y{sup 110} as the only site recognized by these caspases. Surprisingly, TAF15 was cleaved at more than one site in staurosporine-treated Jurkat cells. In addition, we generated two oncogenic TAF15-CIZ/NMP4-fused proteins which have been found in acute myeloid leukemia and demonstrate that caspases-3 and -7 cleave the fusion proteins at one single site. Broad application of this combination approach should expedite identification of novel caspase-interacting proteins and provide new insights into the regulation of caspase pathways leading to cell death in normal and cancer cells.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4]; ;  [3];  [5]
  1. Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)
  2. Department of Chemistry, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)
  3. Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Lineu Prestes 1524, Sao Paulo, SP, CEP 05508-900 (Brazil)
  4. (United States)
  5. Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22199738
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 384; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; APOPTOSIS; GENE REGULATION; IN VITRO; MUTAGENESIS; MYELOID LEUKEMIA; PROTEINS; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Alves, Juliano, E-mail: jalves@gnf.org, Wurdak, Heiko, Garay-Malpartida, Humberto M., Harris, Jennifer L., Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121, Occhiucci, Joao M., Belizario, Jose E., and Li, Jun, E-mail: jli2@gnf.org. TAF15 and the leukemia-associated fusion protein TAF15-CIZ/NMP4 are cleaved by caspases-3 and -7. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.05.009.
Alves, Juliano, E-mail: jalves@gnf.org, Wurdak, Heiko, Garay-Malpartida, Humberto M., Harris, Jennifer L., Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121, Occhiucci, Joao M., Belizario, Jose E., & Li, Jun, E-mail: jli2@gnf.org. TAF15 and the leukemia-associated fusion protein TAF15-CIZ/NMP4 are cleaved by caspases-3 and -7. United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.05.009.
Alves, Juliano, E-mail: jalves@gnf.org, Wurdak, Heiko, Garay-Malpartida, Humberto M., Harris, Jennifer L., Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121, Occhiucci, Joao M., Belizario, Jose E., and Li, Jun, E-mail: jli2@gnf.org. 2009. "TAF15 and the leukemia-associated fusion protein TAF15-CIZ/NMP4 are cleaved by caspases-3 and -7". United States. doi:10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.05.009.
@article{osti_22199738,
title = {TAF15 and the leukemia-associated fusion protein TAF15-CIZ/NMP4 are cleaved by caspases-3 and -7},
author = {Alves, Juliano, E-mail: jalves@gnf.org and Wurdak, Heiko and Garay-Malpartida, Humberto M. and Harris, Jennifer L. and Protease Biochemistry, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 and Occhiucci, Joao M. and Belizario, Jose E. and Li, Jun, E-mail: jli2@gnf.org},
abstractNote = {Caspases are central players in proteolytic pathways that regulate cellular processes such as apoptosis and differentiation. To accelerate the discovery of novel caspase substrates we developed a method combining in silico screening and in vitro validation. With this approach, we identified TAF15 as a novel caspase substrate in a trial study. We find that TAF15 was specifically cleaved by caspases-3 and -7. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the consensus sequence {sup 106}DQPD/Y{sup 110} as the only site recognized by these caspases. Surprisingly, TAF15 was cleaved at more than one site in staurosporine-treated Jurkat cells. In addition, we generated two oncogenic TAF15-CIZ/NMP4-fused proteins which have been found in acute myeloid leukemia and demonstrate that caspases-3 and -7 cleave the fusion proteins at one single site. Broad application of this combination approach should expedite identification of novel caspase-interacting proteins and provide new insights into the regulation of caspase pathways leading to cell death in normal and cancer cells.},
doi = {10.1016/J.BBRC.2009.05.009},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 384,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month = 7
}
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