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Title: X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S

Abstract

We use multi-band spatially resolved photometry from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South to explore the nuclear and extended colors, color gradients, and stellar populations of the host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 3. Based on a study of their central light, we develop X-ray based criteria to exclude objects with strong AGN contamination. We use stellar masses from the FIREWORKS database to understand and account for stellar mass selection effects and carefully study, for the first time, the resolved host galaxy properties of AGNs at z {approx} 2 in their rest-frame optical light without substantial nuclear contamination. AGN hosts span a sizable range of stellar masses, colors, and color gradients at these redshifts. Their colors, color gradients, and stellar population properties are very similar to inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. At z {approx} 1, we find a slightly narrower range in host colors compared to inactive galaxies, as well as hints of more recent star formation. These differences are weaker or non-existent among AGN hosts at z {approx} 2. We discuss the importance of AGN-driven feedback in the quenching of galaxies atmore » z {approx}> 1 and speculate on possible evolution in the relationship between black hole accretion and the host galaxy toward high redshifts.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]; ; ;  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]; ;  [9];  [10]; ;  [11];  [12] more »; « less
  1. Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching, D-85748 (Germany)
  2. Astronomy Department and UCO-Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  3. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)
  4. Department of Physics, Colby College, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States)
  5. Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)
  6. Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)
  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)
  8. Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)
  9. Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States)
  10. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40506-0055 (United States)
  11. Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)
  12. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22167183
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 763; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; BLACK HOLES; COLOR; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; GALAXY NUCLEI; MASS; PHOTOMETRY; RED SHIFT; STAR EVOLUTION; STARS; VISIBLE RADIATION; X RADIATION; X-RAY GALAXIES

Citation Formats

Rosario, D. J., Wuyts, S., Nandra, K., Mozena, M., Faber, S. M., Koo, D. C., Koekemoer, A., Ferguson, H., Grogin, N., McGrath, E., Hathi, N. P., Dekel, A., Donley, J., Dunlop, J. S., Giavalisco, M., Guo, Y., Kocevski, D. D., Laird, E., Rangel, C., Newman, J., and and others. X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/763/1/59.
Rosario, D. J., Wuyts, S., Nandra, K., Mozena, M., Faber, S. M., Koo, D. C., Koekemoer, A., Ferguson, H., Grogin, N., McGrath, E., Hathi, N. P., Dekel, A., Donley, J., Dunlop, J. S., Giavalisco, M., Guo, Y., Kocevski, D. D., Laird, E., Rangel, C., Newman, J., & and others. X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/763/1/59.
Rosario, D. J., Wuyts, S., Nandra, K., Mozena, M., Faber, S. M., Koo, D. C., Koekemoer, A., Ferguson, H., Grogin, N., McGrath, E., Hathi, N. P., Dekel, A., Donley, J., Dunlop, J. S., Giavalisco, M., Guo, Y., Kocevski, D. D., Laird, E., Rangel, C., Newman, J., and and others. 2013. "X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/763/1/59.
@article{osti_22167183,
title = {X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S},
author = {Rosario, D. J. and Wuyts, S. and Nandra, K. and Mozena, M. and Faber, S. M. and Koo, D. C. and Koekemoer, A. and Ferguson, H. and Grogin, N. and McGrath, E. and Hathi, N. P. and Dekel, A. and Donley, J. and Dunlop, J. S. and Giavalisco, M. and Guo, Y. and Kocevski, D. D. and Laird, E. and Rangel, C. and Newman, J. and and others},
abstractNote = {We use multi-band spatially resolved photometry from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South to explore the nuclear and extended colors, color gradients, and stellar populations of the host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 3. Based on a study of their central light, we develop X-ray based criteria to exclude objects with strong AGN contamination. We use stellar masses from the FIREWORKS database to understand and account for stellar mass selection effects and carefully study, for the first time, the resolved host galaxy properties of AGNs at z {approx} 2 in their rest-frame optical light without substantial nuclear contamination. AGN hosts span a sizable range of stellar masses, colors, and color gradients at these redshifts. Their colors, color gradients, and stellar population properties are very similar to inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. At z {approx} 1, we find a slightly narrower range in host colors compared to inactive galaxies, as well as hints of more recent star formation. These differences are weaker or non-existent among AGN hosts at z {approx} 2. We discuss the importance of AGN-driven feedback in the quenching of galaxies at z {approx}> 1 and speculate on possible evolution in the relationship between black hole accretion and the host galaxy toward high redshifts.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/763/1/59},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 763,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 1
}
  • The presence of extremely compact galaxies at z {approx} 2 and their subsequent growth in physical size has been the cause of much puzzlement. We revisit the question using deep infrared Wide Field Camera 3 data to probe the rest-frame optical structure of 935 galaxies selected with 0.4 < z < 2.5 and stellar masses M{sub *} > 10{sup 10.7} M{sub Sun} in the UKIRT Ultra Deep Survey and GOODS-South fields of the CANDELS survey. At each redshift, the most compact sources are those with little or no star formation, and the mean size of these systems at fixed stellarmore » mass grows by a factor of 3.5 {+-} 0.3 over this redshift interval. The data are sufficiently deep to identify companions to these hosts whose stellar masses are ten times smaller. By searching for these around 404 quiescent hosts within a physical annulus 10 h{sup -1} kpc < R < 30 h{sup -1} kpc, we estimate the minor merger rate over 0.4 < z < 2. We find that 13%-18% of quiescent hosts have likely physical companions with stellar mass ratios of 0.1 or greater. Mergers of these companions will typically increase the host mass by 6% {+-} 2% per merger timescale. We estimate the minimum growth rate necessary to explain the declining abundance of compact galaxies. Using a simple model motivated by recent numerical simulations, we then assess whether mergers of the faint companions with their hosts are sufficient to explain this minimal rate. We find that mergers may explain most of the size evolution observed at z {approx}< 1 if a relatively short merger timescale is assumed, but the rapid growth seen at higher redshift likely requires additional physical processes.« less
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  • We measure the UV-continuum slope β for over 4000 high-redshift galaxies over a wide range of redshifts z ∼ 4-8 and luminosities from the HST HUDF/XDF, HUDF09-1, HUDF09-2, ERS, CANDELS-N, and CANDELS-S data sets. Our new β results reach very faint levels at z ∼ 4 (–15.5 mag: 0.006 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}), z ∼ 5 (–16.5 mag: 0.014 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}), and z ∼ 6 and z ∼ 7 (–17 mag: 0.025 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}). Inconsistencies between previous studies led us to conduct a comprehensive review of systematic errors and develop a new technique for measuring β that is robustmore » against biases that arise from the impact of noise. We demonstrate, by object-by-object comparisons, that all previous studies, including our own and those done on the latest HUDF12 data set, suffered from small systematic errors in β. We find that after correcting for the systematic errors (typically Δβ ∼ 0.1-0.2) all β results at z ∼ 7 from different groups are in excellent agreement. The mean β we measure for faint (–18 mag: 0.1 L{sub z=3}{sup ∗}) z ∼ 4, z ∼ 5, z ∼ 6, and z ∼ 7 galaxies is –2.03 ± 0.03 ± 0.06 (random and systematic errors), –2.14 ± 0.06 ± 0.06, –2.24 ± 0.11 ± 0.08, and –2.30 ± 0.18 ± 0.13, respectively. Our new β values are redder than we have reported in the past, but bluer than other recent results. Our previously reported trend of bluer β's at lower luminosities is confirmed, as is the evolution to bluer β's at high redshifts. β appears to show only a mild luminosity dependence faintward of M {sub UV,AB} ∼ –19 mag, suggesting that the mean β asymptotes to ∼–2.2 to –2.4 for faint z ≥ 4 galaxies. At z ∼ 7, the observed β's suggest non-zero, but low dust extinction, and they agree well with values predicted in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.« less
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