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Title: Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

Abstract

The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5]
  1. School of Life Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)
  2. Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)
  3. BMEI CO., LTD, Beijing 100027 (China)
  4. School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)
  5. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22162928
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: 19; Other Information: (c) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOPHYSICS; BIOTECHNOLOGY; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; DIFFUSION BARRIERS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRIC DISCHARGES; ELECTRON TEMPERATURE; INACTIVATION; ION TEMPERATURE; MICROORGANISMS; OPACITY; PLASMA DENSITY; PROLIFERATION; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0065-0273 K; VENTILATION BARRIERS; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL

Citation Formats

Pu, Sichuan, Chen, Jierong, Wang, Gang, Li, Xiaoyong, Ma, Yun, and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xi'an Shiyou University, Xi'an 710065. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4807286.
Pu, Sichuan, Chen, Jierong, Wang, Gang, Li, Xiaoyong, Ma, Yun, & College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xi'an Shiyou University, Xi'an 710065. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4807286.
Pu, Sichuan, Chen, Jierong, Wang, Gang, Li, Xiaoyong, Ma, Yun, and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xi'an Shiyou University, Xi'an 710065. Mon . "Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4807286.
@article{osti_22162928,
title = {Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma},
author = {Pu, Sichuan and Chen, Jierong and Wang, Gang and Li, Xiaoyong and Ma, Yun and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xi'an Shiyou University, Xi'an 710065},
abstractNote = {The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4807286},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 19,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 13 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon May 13 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
  • A submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor (underwater DBD) has been used on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 35150). Plasma treatment was carried out using clean dry air gas to investigate the individual effects of the radicals produced by underwater DBD on an E. coli O157:H7 suspension (8.0 log CFU/ml). E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 6.0 log CFU/ml for 2 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment. Optical Emission Spectra (OES) shows that OH and NO (α, β) radicals, generated by underwater DBD along with ozone gas. E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by 2.3 log CFU/ml for 10 min of underwatermore » DBD plasma treatment with the terephthalic acid (TA) OH radical scavenger solution, which is significantly lower (3.7 log CFU/ml) than the result obtained without using the OH radical scavenger. A maximum of 1.5 ppm of ozone gas was produced during the discharge of underwater DBD, and the obtained reduction difference in E.coli O157:H7 in presence and in absence of ozone gas was 1.68 log CFU/ml. The remainder of the 0.62 log CFU/ml reduction might be due to the effect of the NO (α, β) radicals or due to the combined effect of all the radicals produced by underwater DBD. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide was also generated but does not play any role in E. coli O157:H7 inactivation.« less
  • A magnetic field is introduced to the dielectric-barrier discharge enhanced direct-current glow discharge for efficient plasma generation, with the discharge power of 2.7 W and total energy consumption reduced to 34% of the original. By spatially examining the emission spectra and plasma temperature, it is found that their peaks shift from edges to the center and the negative and anode glows merge into the positive column and disappear, accompanied by improvement of uniformity and chemical activity of the enlarged plasma. This lies in the enhancement of ionization in the curved and lengthened electron path and the dispersion of discharge domains.
  • Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in an initially quiescent room air by a single asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge driven by voltage waveforms consisting of repetitive nanosecond high-voltage pulses superimposed on dc or alternating sinusoidal or square-wave bias voltage. To characterize the pulses and to optimize their matching to the plasma, a numerical code for short pulse calculations with an arbitrary impedance load was developed. A new approach for nonintrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and two-dimensionalmore » numerical fluid modeling. The force and heating rate calculated by a plasma model was used as an input to two-dimensional viscous flow solver to predict the time-dependent dielectric barrier discharge induced flow field. This approach allowed us to restore the entire two-dimensional unsteady plasma induced flow pattern as well as characteristics of the plasma induced force. Both the experiments and computations showed the same vortex flow structures induced by the actuator. Parametric studies of the vortices at different bias voltages, pulse polarities, peak pulse voltages, and pulse repetition rates were conducted experimentally. The significance of charge buildup on the dielectric surface was demonstrated. The charge buildup decreases the effective electric field in the plasma and reduces the plasma actuator performance. The accumulated surface charge can be removed by switching the bias polarity, which leads to a newly proposed voltage waveform consisting of high-voltage nanosecond repetitive pulses superimposed on a high-voltage low frequency sinusoidal voltage. Advantages of the new voltage waveform were demonstrated experimentally.« less
  • A medium-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma gun was used to deposit SiO{sub 2}-like films at ambient temperature under atmospheric pressure. SiO{sub 2}-like films were deposited on Si and stainless-steel surfaces by flowing Ar gas containing hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) monomer through the gun. The authors found that the chemical structure of the deposited SiO{sub 2}-like film strongly depended on the HMDSO monomer ratio in the flowing gas and on the incident power. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed no hydroxyl group in the chemical structure under the low HMDSO ratio in flowing gas or high incident plasma power. Scanning electron microscopy andmore » atomic force microscopy revealed that SiO{sub 2}-like films began to grow as islands and then formed in columns having porosity. Oxygen added to the plasma-gun flow plays a lesser role in the SiO{sub 2}-like deposition from a DBD plasma gun at atmospheric pressure, and the critical temperature for pure SiO{sub 2} formation is also greatly lowered.« less
  • We have investigated the variations of polarization (P) and the temperature ({Delta}T) at the electrode surfaces during the deposition of C-N layer in CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} (1:2) dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The reactive deposition process influences the surface temperature, polarization, and the value of the in situ dielectric constant. We have developed a crude model that correlates the surface temperature and surface polarization with thin film properties. We assume that during the thin film deposition process, the atomic mean kinetic energy is equal to the electrostatic energy stored in the electrode surface area. Theoretically estimated temperature is found to agreemore » well with the experimental results. However, the linear model thus developed cannot be used to explain the phenomena in the interfacial polarization stage that requires a nonlinear theory.« less