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Title: Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector

Abstract

Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22162739
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: (c) 2013 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ALUMINIUM COMPOUNDS; ANTIMONY; ANTIMONY COMPOUNDS; ARSENIC COMPOUNDS; ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CRYSTAL GROWTH; CRYSTALLIZATION; CRYSTALS; GALLIUM ANTIMONIDES; LAYERS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; NANOSTRUCTURES; ORIENTATION; POLARIZATION; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SURFACES; TRANSMISSION; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Husaini, S., Shima, D., Ahirwar, P., Rotter, T. J., Hains, C. P., Dang, T., Bedford, R. G., and Balakrishnan, G. Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4792320.
Husaini, S., Shima, D., Ahirwar, P., Rotter, T. J., Hains, C. P., Dang, T., Bedford, R. G., & Balakrishnan, G. Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4792320.
Husaini, S., Shima, D., Ahirwar, P., Rotter, T. J., Hains, C. P., Dang, T., Bedford, R. G., and Balakrishnan, G. 2013. "Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4792320.
@article{osti_22162739,
title = {Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector},
author = {Husaini, S. and Shima, D. and Ahirwar, P. and Rotter, T. J. and Hains, C. P. and Dang, T. and Bedford, R. G. and Balakrishnan, G.},
abstractNote = {Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4792320},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 2
}
  • Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating at long wavelengths ([gt]1.3 [mu]m), require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. We demonstrate a highly reflective AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.74 [mu]m with maximum reflectivity exceeding 98%, which is well fitted by our theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality withmore » some defects due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.« less
  • Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating in the 1.3--1.5 [mu]m wavelength range require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. For the first time, an AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy is demonstrated. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.53 [mu]m, which is well fitted by these theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality with some defectsmore » due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.« less
  • We demonstrate an undoped 20 1/2 pair AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) grown lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.78 {mu}m with a maximum reflectivity exceeding 99%. We also measure current--voltage characteristics in a similar 10 1/2 period {ital p}-type DBR and find that a current density of 1 {ital kA}/{ital cm}{sup 2} produces a 2.5 V drop. Hole mobilities and doping concentrations in AlAsSb and GaAsSb are also reported. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.
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  • We describe an ultrafast switching operation of a bistable surface-emitting distributed Bragg reflector laser. The rise time was as small as 12 ps and the fall time was 90 ps. Both are much smaller than those of conventional bistable laser diodes. Ths was realized by the effect of the multiple quantum well structure and a strong detuning.