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Title: Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

Abstract

Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sexmore » (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ;  [5];  [6];  [6]
  1. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)
  2. Department of Surgery, Orthopaedic Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)
  3. Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, New York (United States)
  4. Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)
  5. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)
  6. Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22149571
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0360-3016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; CHEMOTHERAPY; FEMALES; FRACTURES; HEALTH HAZARDS; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; OSTEOPOROSIS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; RECTUM; SEX; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Kim, Han Jo, Boland, Patrick J., Meredith, Dennis S., Lis, Eric, Zhang Zhigang, Shi Weiji, Yamada, Yoshiya J., and Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.01.021.
Kim, Han Jo, Boland, Patrick J., Meredith, Dennis S., Lis, Eric, Zhang Zhigang, Shi Weiji, Yamada, Yoshiya J., & Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.01.021.
Kim, Han Jo, Boland, Patrick J., Meredith, Dennis S., Lis, Eric, Zhang Zhigang, Shi Weiji, Yamada, Yoshiya J., and Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org. Thu . "Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.01.021.
@article{osti_22149571,
title = {Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation},
author = {Kim, Han Jo and Boland, Patrick J. and Meredith, Dennis S. and Lis, Eric and Zhang Zhigang and Shi Weiji and Yamada, Yoshiya J. and Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2012.01.021},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
issn = {0360-3016},
number = 3,
volume = 84,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}