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Title: Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

Abstract

To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostatemore » rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require suitable strategies for correction.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [1]
  1. Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22131254
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Medical Dosimetry; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; COMPUTER CODES; CORRECTIONS; DOSIMETRY; ERRORS; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PITCHES; POSITIONING; PROSTATE; RADIOTHERAPY; ROTATION; STANDARDS; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Graf, Reinhold, Boehmer, Dirk, Budach, Volker, and Wust, Peter, E-mail: peter.wust@charite.de. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2012.02.006.
Graf, Reinhold, Boehmer, Dirk, Budach, Volker, & Wust, Peter, E-mail: peter.wust@charite.de. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2012.02.006.
Graf, Reinhold, Boehmer, Dirk, Budach, Volker, and Wust, Peter, E-mail: peter.wust@charite.de. 2012. "Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2012.02.006.
@article{osti_22131254,
title = {Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer},
author = {Graf, Reinhold and Boehmer, Dirk and Budach, Volker and Wust, Peter, E-mail: peter.wust@charite.de},
abstractNote = {To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require suitable strategies for correction.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MEDDOS.2012.02.006},
journal = {Medical Dosimetry},
number = 4,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 1
}
  • To determine whether residual interfraction seminal vesicle (SV) displacement necessitates specific planning target volume (PTV) margins during fiducial-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and 2 subsequent CT scans were prospectively obtained for 20 prostate cancer patients with intraprostatic fiducial markers. After CT registration, SV displacement relative to the prostate was quantified as a function of margin size for both the proximal (1 cm) SV (PSV) and the full SV (FSV). Two IMRT plans were simulated for each patient (prostate + PSV and prostate + FSV) both with a uniform 5-mm PTVmore » margin. Minimum clinical target volume (CTV) dose (D{sub min}) and the volume of SV receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V{sub 95%}) were assessed during treatment and compared with the initial plan. In all cases, SV displacement with respect to the prostate was greater for the FSV compared with the PSV. To ensure at least 95% geometrical coverage of the CTV for 90% of patients, margins of 5 and 8 mm were required for the PSV and FSV, respectively. Dosimetrically, residual SV displacement had minimal impact on PSV coverage compared with FSV coverage. For the PSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in 90% of patients with an overall mean V{sub 95%} of 99.6 {+-} 0.8%; for the FSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in only 45% of patients with a mean V{sub 95%} of 97.9 {+-} 2.4%. The SVs move differentially from the prostate and exhibit greater variation with increasing distance from the prostate. For plans targeting just the prostate and PSVs, 5-mm PTV expansions are adequate. However, despite daily localization of the prostate, larger PTV margins are required for cases where the intent is to completely cover the FSV.« less
  • Purpose: To assess our single institutional experience with daily localization, using fiducials for prostate radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2004 to September 2005, 33 patients were treated with 1,097 intensity-modulated radiation treatments, using three implanted fiducials. Daily portal images were obtained before treatments. Shifts were made for deviations {>=}3 mm in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) dimensions. Results: Of 1,097 treatments, 987 (90%) required shifts. Shifts were made in the LR, SI, and AP dimensions in 51%, 67%, and 58% of treatments, respectively. In the LR dimension, the median distance shifted was 5 mm. Of 739more » shifts in the SI dimension, 73% were in the superior direction for a median distance of 6 mm, and 27% were shifted inferiorly for a median distance of 5 mm. The majority of shifts in the AP dimension were in the anterior direction (87%). Median distances shifted in the anterior and posterior directions were 5 mm and 4 mm, respectively. The median percentage of treatments requiring shifts per patient was 93% (range, 57-100%). Median deviations in the LR, SI, and AP dimensions were 3 mm, 4 mm, and 3 mm, respectively. Deviations in the SI and AP dimensions were more often in the superior rather than inferior (60% vs. 29%) and in the anterior rather than posterior (70% vs. 16%) directions. Conclusions: Interfraction prostate motion is significant. Daily portal imaging with implanted fiducials improves localization of the prostate, and is necessary for the reduction of treatment margins.« less
  • Purpose: To compare the accuracy of imaging modalities, immobilization, localization, and positioning techniques in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer had gold marker seeds implanted transrectally and were treated with fractionated radiotherapy. Twenty of the 35 patients had limited immobilization; the remaining had a vacuum-based immobilization. Patient positioning consisted of alignment with lasers to skin marks, ultrasound or kilovoltage X-ray imaging, optical guidance using infrared reflectors, and megavoltage electronic portal imaging (EPI). The variance of each positioning technique was compared to the patient position determined from the pretreatment EPI. Results: With limited immobilization, themore » average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 9.1 {+-} 5.3 mm, the average difference between the skin marks' infrared position and EPI pretreatment position is 11.8 {+-} 7.2 mm, the average difference between the ultrasound position and EPI pretreatment position is 7.0 {+-} 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 3.5 {+-} 3.1 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 3.4 {+-} 2.7 mm. For the patients with the vacuum-style immobilization, the average difference between the skin marks' laser position and EPI pretreatment position is 10.7 {+-} 4.6 mm, the average difference between kV imaging and EPI pretreatment position is 1.9 {+-} 1.5 mm, and the average intrafraction movement during treatment is 2.1 {+-} 1.5 mm. Conclusions: Compared with use of skin marks, ultrasound imaging for positioning provides an increased degree of agreement to EPI-based positioning, though not as favorable as kV imaging fiducial seeds. Intrafraction movement during treatment decreases with improved immobilization.« less
  • Purpose: To report the incidence and predictors of treatment-related toxicity at 10 years after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 2000, 1571 patients with stages T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT/IMRT with doses ranging from 66 to 81 Gy. The median follow-up was 10 years. Posttreatment toxicities were all graded according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The actuarial likelihood at 10 years for the development of Grade {>=}2 GI toxicities was 9%. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the riskmore » of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities compared with patients treated with conventional 3D-CRT (13% to 5%; p < 0.001). Among patients who experienced acute symptoms the 10-year incidence of late toxicity was 42%, compared with 9% for those who did not experience acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The 10-year incidence of late Grade {>=}2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 15%. Patients treated with 81 Gy (IMRT) had a 20% incidence of GU symptoms at 10 years, compared with a 12% for patient treated to lower doses (p = 0.01). Among patients who had developed acute symptoms during treatment, the incidence of late toxicity at 10 years was 35%, compared with 12% (p < 0.001). The incidence of Grade 3 GI and GU toxicities was 1% and 3%, respectively. Conclusions: Serious late toxicity was unusual despite the delivery of high radiation dose levels in these patients. Higher doses were associated with increased GI and GU Grade 2 toxicities, but the risk of proctitis was significantly reduced with IMRT. Acute symptoms were a precursor of late toxicities in these patients.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy inmore » 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity.« less