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Title: MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144

Abstract

The CXOCY J220132.8-320144 system consists of an edge-on spiral galaxy lensing a background quasar into two bright images. Previous efforts to constrain the mass distribution in the galaxy have suggested that at least one additional image must be present. These extra images may be hidden behind the disk which features a prominent dust lane. We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the system. We do not detect any extra images, but the observations further narrow the observable parameters of the lens system. We explore a range of models to describe the mass distribution in the system and find that a variety of acceptable model fits exist. All plausible models require 2 mag of dust extinction in order to obscure extra images from detection, and some models may require an offset between the center of the galaxy and the center of the dark matter halo of 1 kpc. Currently unobserved images will be detectable by future James Webb Space Telescope observations and will provide strict constraints on the fraction of mass in the disk.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)
  2. Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC), E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)
  3. Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D Santiago (Chile)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22126616
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 769; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; DETECTION; DUSTS; GALAXIES; GRAVITATIONAL LENSES; LIMITING VALUES; MASS; MASS DISTRIBUTION; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; QUASARS; SPACE; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Chen, Jacqueline, Lee, Samuel K., Schechter, Paul L., Castander, Francisco-Javier, and Maza, Jose. MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/769/1/81.
Chen, Jacqueline, Lee, Samuel K., Schechter, Paul L., Castander, Francisco-Javier, & Maza, Jose. MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/769/1/81.
Chen, Jacqueline, Lee, Samuel K., Schechter, Paul L., Castander, Francisco-Javier, and Maza, Jose. Mon . "MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/769/1/81.
@article{osti_22126616,
title = {MISSING LENSED IMAGES AND THE GALAXY DISK MASS IN CXOCY J220132.8-320144},
author = {Chen, Jacqueline and Lee, Samuel K. and Schechter, Paul L. and Castander, Francisco-Javier and Maza, Jose},
abstractNote = {The CXOCY J220132.8-320144 system consists of an edge-on spiral galaxy lensing a background quasar into two bright images. Previous efforts to constrain the mass distribution in the galaxy have suggested that at least one additional image must be present. These extra images may be hidden behind the disk which features a prominent dust lane. We present and analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of the system. We do not detect any extra images, but the observations further narrow the observable parameters of the lens system. We explore a range of models to describe the mass distribution in the system and find that a variety of acceptable model fits exist. All plausible models require 2 mag of dust extinction in order to obscure extra images from detection, and some models may require an offset between the center of the galaxy and the center of the dark matter halo of 1 kpc. Currently unobserved images will be detectable by future James Webb Space Telescope observations and will provide strict constraints on the fraction of mass in the disk.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/769/1/81},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 769,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 20 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon May 20 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
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