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Title: Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

Abstract

Bismuth ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles were synthesized by auto-ignition technique with and without adding ignition fuel such as citric acid. The presence of citric acid in the reaction mixture yielded highly-magnetic BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite. When this composite was annealed to 650 Degree-Sign C, a single phase BFO was formed with average crystallite size of 50 nm and showed weak ferromagnetic behavior. Conversely, the phase pure BFO prepared without adding citric acid exhibited antiferromagnetism because of its larger crystallite size of around 70 nm. The visible-light driven photocatalytic activity of both the pure BFO and BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were examined by degrading methyl orange dye. The pure BFO showed a moderate photocatalytic activity; while BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite showed enhanced activity. This could be probably due to the optimal band gap ratio between BFO and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases reduced the recombination of electron-hole pairs which aided in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. National Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai - 600025 (India)
  2. Advanced Magnetics Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad - 500 058 (India)
  3. Polymer Lab, Central Leather Research Laboratory, Adyar, Chennai - 600020 (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22115985
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1512; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 57. DAE solid state physics symposium 2012, Mumbai (India), 3-7 Dec 2012; Other Information: (c) 2013 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ANNEALING; ANTIFERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; ANTIFERROMAGNETISM; BISMUTH COMPOUNDS; CITRIC ACID; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; ENERGY GAP; FERRITES; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; FERROMAGNETISM; HOLES; METHYL ORANGE; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLES; PHOTOCATALYSIS; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; RECOMBINATION

Citation Formats

Sakar, M., Balakumar, S., Saravanan, P., and Jaisankar, S. N. Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4790994.
Sakar, M., Balakumar, S., Saravanan, P., & Jaisankar, S. N. Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4790994.
Sakar, M., Balakumar, S., Saravanan, P., and Jaisankar, S. N. Tue . "Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4790994.
@article{osti_22115985,
title = {Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles},
author = {Sakar, M. and Balakumar, S. and Saravanan, P. and Jaisankar, S. N.},
abstractNote = {Bismuth ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles were synthesized by auto-ignition technique with and without adding ignition fuel such as citric acid. The presence of citric acid in the reaction mixture yielded highly-magnetic BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite. When this composite was annealed to 650 Degree-Sign C, a single phase BFO was formed with average crystallite size of 50 nm and showed weak ferromagnetic behavior. Conversely, the phase pure BFO prepared without adding citric acid exhibited antiferromagnetism because of its larger crystallite size of around 70 nm. The visible-light driven photocatalytic activity of both the pure BFO and BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were examined by degrading methyl orange dye. The pure BFO showed a moderate photocatalytic activity; while BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite showed enhanced activity. This could be probably due to the optimal band gap ratio between BFO and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases reduced the recombination of electron-hole pairs which aided in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4790994},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1512,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2013},
month = {Tue Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2013}
}
  • Highlights: ► TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite acts as magnetic photocatalyst nanoparticle. ► SiO{sub 2} interlayer is used to prevent electron migration between photocatalyst and magnetic core. ► TiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite without SiO{sub 2} interlayer shows poor magnetic and photocatalytic property. -- Abstract: A magnetic photocatalyst, TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Mn–Zn ferrite, was prepared by stepwise synthesis involving the co-precipitation of Mn–Zn ferrite as a magnetic core, followed by a coating of silica as the interlayer, and titania as the top layer. The particle size and distribution of magnetic nanoparticles were found to depend on the addition rate of reagent and dispersing ratemore » of reaction. The X-ray diffractometer and transmission electron microscope were used to examine the crystal structures and the morphologies of the prepared composites. Vibrating sample magnetometer was also used to reveal their superparamagnetic property. The UV–Vis spectrophotometer was employed to monitor the decomposition of methylene blue in the photocatalytic efficient study. It was found that at least a minimum thickness of the silica interlayer around 20 nm was necessary for the inhibition of electron transference initiated by TiO{sub 2} and Mn–Zn ferrite.« less
  • We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (∼75 nm and ∼155 nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6 eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500 eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg Kα (1253.6 eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below themore » surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.« less
  • Multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanowires are prepared through polyol method with an average diameter of 35 nm with a narrow size distribution. The band gap was determined to be 2.10 eV, indicating their potential application as visible-light-response photo catalyst. The magnificent photocatalytic behaviors of BiFeO{sub 3} nanowires are understood from the methyl violet degradation under visible light irradiation. Moreover, the nano-wire takes only a lesser time for the diffusion of electron-hole pair from the surface of the sample. Further the BiFeO{sub 3} nano-wire was characterized using XRD, SEM, and U-V. The ferroelectric studies of BiFeO{sub 3} nano-wire show a frequency dependent propertymore » and maximum coercivity of 2.7 V/cm were achieved with a remanent polarization at 0.5 µC/cm{sup 2} at the frequency 4 kHz. The coercivity of BiFeO{sub 3} nano wire changes with variation of frequency from 1 kHz to 4 kHz.« less
  • The synthesis of bismuth ferrite by solid-state reaction of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} results in the formation of multiphase products. Even coprecipitation followed by calcination leads to the formation of impurity phases. Here, we report the synthesis of magnetoelectric bismuth ferrite by a ferrioxalate precursor method. In this process, bismuth ferrite, synthesized through solutions of some specific salts led to the formation of phase pure (perovskite) nanocrystalline powder (11-22 nm as evident from X-ray diffraction analysis) at a temperature of 600 deg. C. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, Fouriermore » transformation infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis route is simple, energy saving and cost-effective. Such nanosized bismuth ferrite powder may have a potential application in making lead free piezoelectric materials for actuators as well as magnetoelectric sensors.« less
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) nanoparticles were grown by hydrothermal microwave method (HTMW). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The soaking time is effective in improving phase formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rietveld refinement reveals an orthorhombic structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed magnetism of the BFO crystallites is a consequence of particle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HTMW is a genuine technique for low temperatures and short times of synthesis. -- Abstract: Hydrothermal microwave method (HTMW) was used to synthesize crystalline bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) nanoparticles (BFO) in the temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C with times ranging from 5 min to 1 h. BFO nanoparticles were characterized by means of X-raymore » analyses, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, TG-DTA and FE-SEM. X-ray diffraction results indicated that longer soaking time was benefit to refraining the formation of any impurity phases and growing BFO crystallites into almost single-phase perovskites. Typical FT-IR spectra for BFO nanoparticles presented well defined bands, indicating a substantial short-range order in the system. TG-DTA analyses confirmed the presence of lattice OH{sup -} groups, commonly found in materials obtained by HTMW process. Compared with the conventional solid-state reaction process, submicron BFO crystallites with better homogeneity could be produced at the temperature as low as 180 Degree-Sign C. These results show that the HTMW synthesis route is rapid, cost effective, and could be used as an alternative to obtain BFO nanoparticles in the temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C for 1 h.« less