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Title: Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition

Abstract

Complex oxide epitaxial film growth is a rich and exciting field, owing to the wide variety of physical properties present in oxides. These properties include ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, spin-polarization, and a variety of other correlated phenomena. Traditionally, high quality epitaxial oxide films have been grown via oxide molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition. Here, we present the growth of high quality epitaxial films using an alternative approach, the pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. We demonstrate all three epitaxial growth modes in different oxide systems: Frank-van der Merwe (layer-by-layer); Stranski-Krastanov (layer-then-island); and Volmer-Weber (island). Analysis of film quality and morphology is presented and techniques to optimize the morphology of films are discussed.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [3]
  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)
  2. Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22102202
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2013 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BISMUTH COMPOUNDS; COBALT COMPOUNDS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ENERGY BEAM DEPOSITION; FERROELECTRIC MATERIALS; FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS; FERROMAGNETISM; LANTHANUM COMPOUNDS; LASER RADIATION; LAYERS; MOLECULAR BEAM EPITAXY; PULSED IRRADIATION; SPIN; SPIN ORIENTATION; STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS; THIN FILMS

Citation Formats

Comes, Ryan, Liu Hongxue, Lu Jiwei, Gu, Man, Khokhlov, Mikhail, Wolf, Stuart A., and Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina 27410. Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4774238.
Comes, Ryan, Liu Hongxue, Lu Jiwei, Gu, Man, Khokhlov, Mikhail, Wolf, Stuart A., & Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina 27410. Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4774238.
Comes, Ryan, Liu Hongxue, Lu Jiwei, Gu, Man, Khokhlov, Mikhail, Wolf, Stuart A., and Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina 27410. 2013. "Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4774238.
@article{osti_22102202,
title = {Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition},
author = {Comes, Ryan and Liu Hongxue and Lu Jiwei and Gu, Man and Khokhlov, Mikhail and Wolf, Stuart A. and Guilford College, Greensboro, North Carolina 27410},
abstractNote = {Complex oxide epitaxial film growth is a rich and exciting field, owing to the wide variety of physical properties present in oxides. These properties include ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, spin-polarization, and a variety of other correlated phenomena. Traditionally, high quality epitaxial oxide films have been grown via oxide molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition. Here, we present the growth of high quality epitaxial films using an alternative approach, the pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. We demonstrate all three epitaxial growth modes in different oxide systems: Frank-van der Merwe (layer-by-layer); Stranski-Krastanov (layer-then-island); and Volmer-Weber (island). Analysis of film quality and morphology is presented and techniques to optimize the morphology of films are discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4774238},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 1
}
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