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Title: A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

Abstract

Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determiningmore » if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase. Conclusions: The authors developed a fast and clinically feasible patient-specific collision detection program for proton therapy based on a ray casting algorithm. If incorporated during the treatment planning phase it may lead to improved clinical efficiency. This methodology could also be applied to patient collision detection in photon therapy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)
  2. (United States) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)
  3. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22099094
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALGORITHMS; CASTING; CAT SCANNING; COLLIMATORS; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; IMAGE PROCESSING; PATIENTS; PHANTOMS; PHOTONS; PLANNING; PROTONS; RADIOTHERAPY; ROTATION

Citation Formats

Zou Wei, Lin Haibo, Plastaras, John P., Wang Huanshu, Bui, Viet, Vapiwala, Neha, McDonough, James, Tochner, Zelig, Both, Stefan, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4760988.
Zou Wei, Lin Haibo, Plastaras, John P., Wang Huanshu, Bui, Viet, Vapiwala, Neha, McDonough, James, Tochner, Zelig, Both, Stefan, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, & Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4760988.
Zou Wei, Lin Haibo, Plastaras, John P., Wang Huanshu, Bui, Viet, Vapiwala, Neha, McDonough, James, Tochner, Zelig, Both, Stefan, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104. Thu . "A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4760988.
@article{osti_22099094,
title = {A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy},
author = {Zou Wei and Lin Haibo and Plastaras, John P. and Wang Huanshu and Bui, Viet and Vapiwala, Neha and McDonough, James and Tochner, Zelig and Both, Stefan and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase. Conclusions: The authors developed a fast and clinically feasible patient-specific collision detection program for proton therapy based on a ray casting algorithm. If incorporated during the treatment planning phase it may lead to improved clinical efficiency. This methodology could also be applied to patient collision detection in photon therapy.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4760988},
journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 11,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}