skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Measurement and correction of leaf open times in helical tomotherapy

Abstract

Purpose: The binary multileaf collimator (MLC) is one of the most important components in helical tomotherapy (HT), as it modulates the dose delivered to the patient. However, methods to ensure MLC quality in HT treatments are lacking. The authors obtained data on the performance of the MLC in treatments administered in their department in order to assess possible delivery errors due to the MLC. Correction methods based on their data are proposed. Methods: Twenty sinograms from treatments delivered using both of the authors HT systems were measured and analyzed by recording the fluence collected by the imaging detector. Planned and actual sinograms were compared using distributions of leaf open time (LOT) errors, as well as differences in fluence reconstructed at each of the 51 projections into which the treatment planning system divides each rotation for optimization purposes. They proposed and applied a method based on individual leaf error correction and the increase in projection time to prevent latency effects when LOT is close to projection time. In order to analyze the dosimetric impact of the corrections, inphantom measurements were made for four corrected treatments. Results: The LOTs measured were consistent with those planned. Most of the mean errors in LOTmore » distributions were within 1 ms with standard deviations of over 4 ms. Reconstructed fluences showed good results, with over 90% of points passing the 3% criterion, except in treatments with a short mean LOT, where the percentage of passing points was as low as 66%. Individual leaf errors were as long as 4 ms in some cases. Corrected sinograms improved error distribution, with standard deviations of over 3 ms and increased percentages of points passing 3% in the fluence per angle analysis, especially in treatments with a short mean LOT and those that were more subject to latency effects. The minimum percentage of points within 3% increased to 86%. In-phantom measurements of the corrected treatments showed that, while treatments affected by latency effects were improved, those affected by individual leaf errors were not. Conclusions: Measurement of MLC performance in real treatments provides the authors with a valuable tool for ensuring the quality of HT delivery. The LOTs of MLC are very accurate in most cases. Sources of error were found and correction methods proposed and applied. The corrections decreased the amount of LOT errors. The dosimetric impact of these corrections should be evaluated more thoroughly using 3D dose distribution analysis.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Medical Physics, Tomotherapy Unit, Grupo IMO, Madrid 28010 (Spain)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22099088
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: (c) 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; COLLIMATORS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CORRECTIONS; CT-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY; ERRORS; OPTIMIZATION; PATIENTS; PERFORMANCE; PHANTOMS; PLANNING; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; STANDARDS

Citation Formats

Sevillano, David, Minguez, Cristina, Sanchez, Alicia, and Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto. Measurement and correction of leaf open times in helical tomotherapy. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4762565.
Sevillano, David, Minguez, Cristina, Sanchez, Alicia, & Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto. Measurement and correction of leaf open times in helical tomotherapy. United States. doi:10.1118/1.4762565.
Sevillano, David, Minguez, Cristina, Sanchez, Alicia, and Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto. Thu . "Measurement and correction of leaf open times in helical tomotherapy". United States. doi:10.1118/1.4762565.
@article{osti_22099088,
title = {Measurement and correction of leaf open times in helical tomotherapy},
author = {Sevillano, David and Minguez, Cristina and Sanchez, Alicia and Sanchez-Reyes, Alberto},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The binary multileaf collimator (MLC) is one of the most important components in helical tomotherapy (HT), as it modulates the dose delivered to the patient. However, methods to ensure MLC quality in HT treatments are lacking. The authors obtained data on the performance of the MLC in treatments administered in their department in order to assess possible delivery errors due to the MLC. Correction methods based on their data are proposed. Methods: Twenty sinograms from treatments delivered using both of the authors HT systems were measured and analyzed by recording the fluence collected by the imaging detector. Planned and actual sinograms were compared using distributions of leaf open time (LOT) errors, as well as differences in fluence reconstructed at each of the 51 projections into which the treatment planning system divides each rotation for optimization purposes. They proposed and applied a method based on individual leaf error correction and the increase in projection time to prevent latency effects when LOT is close to projection time. In order to analyze the dosimetric impact of the corrections, inphantom measurements were made for four corrected treatments. Results: The LOTs measured were consistent with those planned. Most of the mean errors in LOT distributions were within 1 ms with standard deviations of over 4 ms. Reconstructed fluences showed good results, with over 90% of points passing the 3% criterion, except in treatments with a short mean LOT, where the percentage of passing points was as low as 66%. Individual leaf errors were as long as 4 ms in some cases. Corrected sinograms improved error distribution, with standard deviations of over 3 ms and increased percentages of points passing 3% in the fluence per angle analysis, especially in treatments with a short mean LOT and those that were more subject to latency effects. The minimum percentage of points within 3% increased to 86%. In-phantom measurements of the corrected treatments showed that, while treatments affected by latency effects were improved, those affected by individual leaf errors were not. Conclusions: Measurement of MLC performance in real treatments provides the authors with a valuable tool for ensuring the quality of HT delivery. The LOTs of MLC are very accurate in most cases. Sources of error were found and correction methods proposed and applied. The corrections decreased the amount of LOT errors. The dosimetric impact of these corrections should be evaluated more thoroughly using 3D dose distribution analysis.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4762565},
journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 11,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}