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Title: Positron emission mammography (PEM): Effect of activity concentration, object size, and object contrast on phantom lesion detection

Abstract

Purpose: To characterize the relationship between lesion detection sensitivity and injected activity as a function of lesion size and contrast on the PEM (positron emission mammography) Flex Solo II scanner using phantom experiments. Methods: Phantom lesions (spheres 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mm diameter) were randomly located in uniform background. Sphere activity concentrations were 3 to 21 times the background activity concentration (BGc). BGc was a surrogate for injected activity; BGc ranged from 0.44-4.1 kBq/mL, corresponding to 46-400 MBq injections. Seven radiologists read 108 images containing zero, one, or two spheres. Readers used a 5-point confidence scale to score the presence of spheres. Results: Sensitivity was 100% for lesions {>=}12 mm under all conditions except for one 12 mm sphere with the lowest contrast and lowest BGc (60% sensitivity). Sensitivity was 100% for 8 mm spheres when either contrast or BGc was high, and 100% for 4 mm spheres only when both contrast and BGc were highest. Sphere contrast recovery coefficients (CRC) were 49%, 34%, 26%, 14%, and 2.8% for the largest to smallest spheres. Cumulative specificity was 98%. Conclusions: Phantom lesion detection sensitivity depends more on sphere size and contrast than on BGc. Detection sensitivity remained {>=}90% formore » injected activities as low as 100 MBq, for lesions {>=}8 mm. Low CRC in 4 mm objects results in moderate detection sensitivity even for 400 MBq injected activity, making it impractical to optimize injected activity for such lesions. Low CRC indicates that when lesions <8 mm are observed on PEM images they are highly tracer avid with greater potential of clinical significance. High specificity (98%) suggests that image statistical noise does not lead to false positive findings. These results apply to the 85 mm thick object used to obtain them; lesion detectability should be better (worse) for thinner (thicker) objects based on the reduced (increased) influence of photon attenuation.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22099056
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; EMISSION; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGES; MAMMARY GLANDS; PHANTOMS; PHOTONS; POSITRONS; RADIATION DOSES; SENSITIVITY; SPECIFICITY

Citation Formats

MacDonald, Lawrence R., Wang, Carolyn L., Eissa, Marna, Haseley, David, Kelly, Mary M., Liu, Franklin, Parikh, Jay R., Beatty, J. David, Rogers, James V., Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104, Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104, Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195, and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104. Positron emission mammography (PEM): Effect of activity concentration, object size, and object contrast on phantom lesion detection. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1118/1.4754651.
MacDonald, Lawrence R., Wang, Carolyn L., Eissa, Marna, Haseley, David, Kelly, Mary M., Liu, Franklin, Parikh, Jay R., Beatty, J. David, Rogers, James V., Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104, Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104, Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195, & Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104. Positron emission mammography (PEM): Effect of activity concentration, object size, and object contrast on phantom lesion detection. United States. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.4754651
MacDonald, Lawrence R., Wang, Carolyn L., Eissa, Marna, Haseley, David, Kelly, Mary M., Liu, Franklin, Parikh, Jay R., Beatty, J. David, Rogers, James V., Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104, Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104, Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195, and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104. Mon . "Positron emission mammography (PEM): Effect of activity concentration, object size, and object contrast on phantom lesion detection". United States. https://doi.org/10.1118/1.4754651.
@article{osti_22099056,
title = {Positron emission mammography (PEM): Effect of activity concentration, object size, and object contrast on phantom lesion detection},
author = {MacDonald, Lawrence R. and Wang, Carolyn L. and Eissa, Marna and Haseley, David and Kelly, Mary M. and Liu, Franklin and Parikh, Jay R. and Beatty, J. David and Rogers, James V. and Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104 and Department of Radiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357987, Seattle, Washington 98195 and Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, 1221 Madison Street Arnold Pavilion, Seattle, Washington 98104},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To characterize the relationship between lesion detection sensitivity and injected activity as a function of lesion size and contrast on the PEM (positron emission mammography) Flex Solo II scanner using phantom experiments. Methods: Phantom lesions (spheres 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mm diameter) were randomly located in uniform background. Sphere activity concentrations were 3 to 21 times the background activity concentration (BGc). BGc was a surrogate for injected activity; BGc ranged from 0.44-4.1 kBq/mL, corresponding to 46-400 MBq injections. Seven radiologists read 108 images containing zero, one, or two spheres. Readers used a 5-point confidence scale to score the presence of spheres. Results: Sensitivity was 100% for lesions {>=}12 mm under all conditions except for one 12 mm sphere with the lowest contrast and lowest BGc (60% sensitivity). Sensitivity was 100% for 8 mm spheres when either contrast or BGc was high, and 100% for 4 mm spheres only when both contrast and BGc were highest. Sphere contrast recovery coefficients (CRC) were 49%, 34%, 26%, 14%, and 2.8% for the largest to smallest spheres. Cumulative specificity was 98%. Conclusions: Phantom lesion detection sensitivity depends more on sphere size and contrast than on BGc. Detection sensitivity remained {>=}90% for injected activities as low as 100 MBq, for lesions {>=}8 mm. Low CRC in 4 mm objects results in moderate detection sensitivity even for 400 MBq injected activity, making it impractical to optimize injected activity for such lesions. Low CRC indicates that when lesions <8 mm are observed on PEM images they are highly tracer avid with greater potential of clinical significance. High specificity (98%) suggests that image statistical noise does not lead to false positive findings. These results apply to the 85 mm thick object used to obtain them; lesion detectability should be better (worse) for thinner (thicker) objects based on the reduced (increased) influence of photon attenuation.},
doi = {10.1118/1.4754651},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/22099056}, journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 10,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {10}
}