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Title: Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives

Abstract

This is a personal account of the development of the title subject which is the broader field encompassing surface photochemistry. It describes the early times when the main interest centered on desorption induced by slow electrons, follows its evolution in experiment (use of synchrotron radiation and connections to electron spectroscopies; use of lasers) and mechanisms, and briefly mentions the many different subfields that have evolved. It discusses some practically important aspects and applications and ends with an account of an evolving new subfield, the application to photochemistry on nanoparticles.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Department of Chemical Physics, Berlin (Germany) and Physik-Department E20, Technical University Muenchen, Garching (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22098988
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 137; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: (c) 2012 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; DESORPTION; ELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; ELECTRONS; EVOLUTION; LASERS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PHOTOCHEMISTRY; SURFACES; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

Citation Formats

Menzel, Dietrich. Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4746799.
Menzel, Dietrich. Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4746799.
Menzel, Dietrich. 2012. "Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4746799.
@article{osti_22098988,
title = {Electronically induced surface reactions: Evolution, concepts, and perspectives},
author = {Menzel, Dietrich},
abstractNote = {This is a personal account of the development of the title subject which is the broader field encompassing surface photochemistry. It describes the early times when the main interest centered on desorption induced by slow electrons, follows its evolution in experiment (use of synchrotron radiation and connections to electron spectroscopies; use of lasers) and mechanisms, and briefly mentions the many different subfields that have evolved. It discusses some practically important aspects and applications and ends with an account of an evolving new subfield, the application to photochemistry on nanoparticles.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4746799},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 9,
volume = 137,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 9
}
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