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Title: A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager

Abstract

Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 {mu}m thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQEmore » were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state-of-art flat panel detector (FPD).« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)
  2. (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22098560
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Medical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 7; Other Information: (c) 2011 American Association of Physicists in Medicine; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-2405
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD VESSELS; CESIUM IODIDES; CHARGE-COUPLED DEVICES; FIBERS; FLUOROSCOPY; IMAGE INTENSIFIERS; MICROCHANNEL ELECTRON MULTIPLIERS; NOISE; PATIENTS; PHOSPHORS; RADIATION DETECTORS; SENSITIVITY; SENSORS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SPECTRA; THALLIUM ADDITIONS; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; X RADIATION; X-RAY DETECTION

Citation Formats

Jain, Amit, Bednarek, D. R., Ionita, Ciprian, Rudin, S., Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214, Department of Neurosurgery, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214, and Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1118/1.3599751.
Jain, Amit, Bednarek, D. R., Ionita, Ciprian, Rudin, S., Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214, Department of Neurosurgery, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214, & Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214. A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager. United States. doi:10.1118/1.3599751.
Jain, Amit, Bednarek, D. R., Ionita, Ciprian, Rudin, S., Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214, Department of Neurosurgery, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214, and Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214. Fri . "A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager". United States. doi:10.1118/1.3599751.
@article{osti_22098560,
title = {A theoretical and experimental evaluation of the microangiographic fluoroscope: A high-resolution region-of-interest x-ray imager},
author = {Jain, Amit and Bednarek, D. R. and Ionita, Ciprian and Rudin, S. and Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214 and Department of Neurosurgery, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214 and Department of Radiology, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Toshiba Stroke Research Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14214},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The increasing need for better image quality and high spatial resolution for successful endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) and the inherent limitations of the state-of-the-art detectors provide motivation to develop a detector system tailored to the specific, demanding requirements of neurointerventional applications.Method: A microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF) was developed to serve as a high-resolution, region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray imaging detector in conjunction with large lower-resolution full field-of-view (FOV) state-of-the-art x-ray detectors. The newly developed MAF is an indirect x-ray imaging detector capable of providing real-time images (30 frames per second) with high-resolution, high sensitivity, no lag and low instrumentation noise. It consists of a CCD camera coupled to a Gen 2 dual-stage microchannel plate light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. A 300 {mu}m thick CsI(Tl) phosphor serving as the front end is coupled to the LII. The LII is the key component of the MAF and the large variable gain provided by it enables the MAF to operate as a quantum-noise-limited detector for both fluoroscopy and angiography. Results: The linear cascade model was used to predict the theoretical performance of the MAF, and the theoretical prediction showed close agreement with experimental findings. Linear system metrics such as MTF and DQE were used to gauge the detector performance up to 10 cycles/mm. The measured zero frequency DQE(0) was 0.55 for an RQA5 spectrum. A total of 21 stages were identified for the whole imaging chain and each stage was characterized individually. Conclusions: The linear cascade model analysis provides insight into the imaging chain and may be useful for further development of the MAF detector. The preclinical testing of the prototype detector in animal procedures is showing encouraging results and points to the potential for significant impact on EIGIs when used in conjunction with a state-of-art flat panel detector (FPD).},
doi = {10.1118/1.3599751},
journal = {Medical Physics},
issn = {0094-2405},
number = 7,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}