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Title: Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields

Abstract

We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980 (Japan)
  2. Faculty of Physics, National University of Uzbekistan, Vuzgorodok, Tashkent 100174 (Uzbekistan)
  3. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22095391
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: (c) 2011 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ACCELERATION; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; CHARGED PARTICLES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; POTENTIALS; SINGULARITY; WAVE FUNCTIONS

Citation Formats

Masuda, Shumpei, Nakamura, Katsuhiro, and Department of Applied Physics, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.043434.
Masuda, Shumpei, Nakamura, Katsuhiro, & Department of Applied Physics, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585. Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.043434.
Masuda, Shumpei, Nakamura, Katsuhiro, and Department of Applied Physics, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585. 2011. "Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.043434.
@article{osti_22095391,
title = {Acceleration of adiabatic quantum dynamics in electromagnetic fields},
author = {Masuda, Shumpei and Nakamura, Katsuhiro and Department of Applied Physics, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585},
abstractNote = {We show a method to accelerate quantum adiabatic dynamics of wave functions under electromagnetic field (EMF) by developing the preceding theory [Masuda and Nakamura, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 466, 1135 (2010)]. Treating the orbital dynamics of a charged particle in EMF, we derive the driving field which accelerates quantum adiabatic dynamics in order to obtain the final adiabatic states in any desired short time. The scheme is consolidated by describing a way to overcome possible singularities in both the additional phase and driving potential due to nodes proper to wave functions under EMF. As explicit examples, we exhibit the fast forward of adiabatic squeezing and transport of excited Landau states with nonzero angular momentum, obtaining the result consistent with the transitionless quantum driving applied to the orbital dynamics in EMF.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.043434},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 4,
volume = 84,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month =
}
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