skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Part II - The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system

Abstract

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This empirical study explores the relationship between data and resultant waste knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study shows that 'Experience, Data and Theory' account for 54.1% of the variance in knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A strategic framework for Municipalities emerged from this study. - Abstract: Combining the process of learning and the theory of planned behaviour into a new theoretical framework provides an opportunity to explore the impact of data on waste behaviour, and consequently on waste management, in South Africa. Fitting the data to the theoretical framework shows that there are only three constructs which have a significant effect on behaviour, viz experience, knowledge, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Knowledge has a significant influence on all three of the antecedents to behavioural intention (attitude, subjective norm and PBC). However, it is PBC, and not intention, that has the greatest influence on waste behaviour. While respondents may have an intention to act, this intention does not always manifest as actual waste behaviour, suggesting limited volitional control. The theoretical framework accounts for 53.7% of the variance in behaviour, suggesting significant external influences on behaviour not accounted for in the framework. While the theoretical model remains the same, respondents in public and private organisationsmore » represent two statistically significant sub-groups in the data set. The theoretical framework accounts for 47.8% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in public waste organisations and 57.6% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in private organisations. The results suggest that respondents in public and private waste organisations are subject to different structural forces that shape knowledge, intention, and resultant waste behaviour.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)
  2. (South Africa)
  3. University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Development Studies, Durban 4041 (South Africa)
  4. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)
  5. University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041 (South Africa)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22089897
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; ATTITUDES; CONTROL; DATA ANALYSIS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; SOUTH AFRICA; WASTE MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

Godfrey, Linda, University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041, Scott, Dianne, Difford, Mark, and Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za. Part II - The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.018.
Godfrey, Linda, University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041, Scott, Dianne, Difford, Mark, & Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za. Part II - The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system. United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.018.
Godfrey, Linda, University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041, Scott, Dianne, Difford, Mark, and Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za. Thu . "Part II - The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system". United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.018.
@article{osti_22089897,
title = {Part II - The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system},
author = {Godfrey, Linda and University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041 and Scott, Dianne and Difford, Mark and Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za},
abstractNote = {Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This empirical study explores the relationship between data and resultant waste knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study shows that 'Experience, Data and Theory' account for 54.1% of the variance in knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A strategic framework for Municipalities emerged from this study. - Abstract: Combining the process of learning and the theory of planned behaviour into a new theoretical framework provides an opportunity to explore the impact of data on waste behaviour, and consequently on waste management, in South Africa. Fitting the data to the theoretical framework shows that there are only three constructs which have a significant effect on behaviour, viz experience, knowledge, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Knowledge has a significant influence on all three of the antecedents to behavioural intention (attitude, subjective norm and PBC). However, it is PBC, and not intention, that has the greatest influence on waste behaviour. While respondents may have an intention to act, this intention does not always manifest as actual waste behaviour, suggesting limited volitional control. The theoretical framework accounts for 53.7% of the variance in behaviour, suggesting significant external influences on behaviour not accounted for in the framework. While the theoretical model remains the same, respondents in public and private organisations represent two statistically significant sub-groups in the data set. The theoretical framework accounts for 47.8% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in public waste organisations and 57.6% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in private organisations. The results suggest that respondents in public and private waste organisations are subject to different structural forces that shape knowledge, intention, and resultant waste behaviour.},
doi = {10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.018},
journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = 11,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}