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Title: Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China

Abstract

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets outmore » requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany)
  2. University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany)
  3. Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22086566
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ASHES; CHINA; COST; DECISION MAKING; EVALUATION; FLUE GAS; INCINERATORS; INVESTMENT; LEAKS; RECOMMENDATIONS; SOLID WASTES; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; TOXICITY; TRAINING; WASTE DISPOSAL; WATER

Citation Formats

Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de, Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de, Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de, and Jinming, Cai. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.038.
Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de, Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de, Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de, & Jinming, Cai. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China. United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.038.
Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de, Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de, Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de, and Jinming, Cai. Thu . "Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China". United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.038.
@article{osti_22086566,
title = {Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China},
author = {Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de and Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de and Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de and Jinming, Cai},
abstractNote = {Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.},
doi = {10.1016/J.WASMAN.2012.05.038},
journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = 11,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}