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Title: THE LUMINOUS INFRARED HOST GALAXY OF SHORT-DURATION GRB 100206A

Abstract

The known host galaxies of short-hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to date are characterized by low to moderate star formation rates (SFRs) and a broad range of stellar masses, in general agreement with models associating the phenomenon with an old progenitor, such as merging neutron stars. In this paper, we positionally associate the recent unambiguously short-hard Swift GRB 100206A with a disk galaxy at redshift z = 0.4068 that is rapidly forming stars at a rate of {approx}30 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, almost an order of magnitude higher than any previously identified short-GRB host. The galaxy is very red (g - K = 4.3 AB mag), heavily obscured (A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 2 mag), and has the highest metallicity of any GRB host to date (12 + log[O/H]{sub KD02} = 9.2): it is a classical luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG), with L {sub IR} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L {sub Sun }. While these properties could be interpreted to support an association of this GRB with recent star formation, modeling of the broadband spectral energy distribution also indicates that a substantial stellar mass of mostly older stars is also present. The specific SFR is modest (sSFR Almost-Equal-To 0.5 Gyr{sup -1}), themore » current SFR is not substantially elevated above its long-term average, and the host morphology shows no sign of recent merger activity. Our observations are therefore equally consistent with an older progenitor. Given the precedent established by previous short-GRB hosts and the significant fraction of the universe's stellar mass in LIRG-like systems at z {approx}> 0.3, an older progenitor represents the most likely origin of this event.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ; ; ;  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  2. Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)
  3. Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)
  4. School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22086502
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 758; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; ENERGY SPECTRA; GALAXIES; GAMMA ASTRONOMY; INFRARED RADIATION; MORPHOLOGY; NEUTRON STARS; RED SHIFT; STAR EVOLUTION; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Perley, D. A., Modjaz, M., Morgan, A. N., Cenko, S. B., Bloom, J. S., Filippenko, A. V., Miller, A. A., and Butler, N. R., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu. THE LUMINOUS INFRARED HOST GALAXY OF SHORT-DURATION GRB 100206A. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/758/2/122.
Perley, D. A., Modjaz, M., Morgan, A. N., Cenko, S. B., Bloom, J. S., Filippenko, A. V., Miller, A. A., & Butler, N. R., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu. THE LUMINOUS INFRARED HOST GALAXY OF SHORT-DURATION GRB 100206A. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/758/2/122.
Perley, D. A., Modjaz, M., Morgan, A. N., Cenko, S. B., Bloom, J. S., Filippenko, A. V., Miller, A. A., and Butler, N. R., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu. Sat . "THE LUMINOUS INFRARED HOST GALAXY OF SHORT-DURATION GRB 100206A". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/758/2/122.
@article{osti_22086502,
title = {THE LUMINOUS INFRARED HOST GALAXY OF SHORT-DURATION GRB 100206A},
author = {Perley, D. A. and Modjaz, M. and Morgan, A. N. and Cenko, S. B. and Bloom, J. S. and Filippenko, A. V. and Miller, A. A. and Butler, N. R., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu},
abstractNote = {The known host galaxies of short-hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to date are characterized by low to moderate star formation rates (SFRs) and a broad range of stellar masses, in general agreement with models associating the phenomenon with an old progenitor, such as merging neutron stars. In this paper, we positionally associate the recent unambiguously short-hard Swift GRB 100206A with a disk galaxy at redshift z = 0.4068 that is rapidly forming stars at a rate of {approx}30 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, almost an order of magnitude higher than any previously identified short-GRB host. The galaxy is very red (g - K = 4.3 AB mag), heavily obscured (A{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 2 mag), and has the highest metallicity of any GRB host to date (12 + log[O/H]{sub KD02} = 9.2): it is a classical luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG), with L {sub IR} Almost-Equal-To 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L {sub Sun }. While these properties could be interpreted to support an association of this GRB with recent star formation, modeling of the broadband spectral energy distribution also indicates that a substantial stellar mass of mostly older stars is also present. The specific SFR is modest (sSFR Almost-Equal-To 0.5 Gyr{sup -1}), the current SFR is not substantially elevated above its long-term average, and the host morphology shows no sign of recent merger activity. Our observations are therefore equally consistent with an older progenitor. Given the precedent established by previous short-GRB hosts and the significant fraction of the universe's stellar mass in LIRG-like systems at z {approx}> 0.3, an older progenitor represents the most likely origin of this event.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/758/2/122},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 758,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {10}
}