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Title: Search for supernova {sup 60}Fe in the Earth's microfossil record

Abstract

Approximately 2.8 Myr before the present our planet was subjected to the debris of a supernova explosion. The terrestrial proxy for this event was the discovery of live atoms of {sup 60}Fe in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust. The signature for this supernova event should also reside in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) microfossils produced by magnetotactic bacteria extant at the time of the Earth-supernova interaction, provided the bacteria preferentially uptake iron from fine-grained iron oxides and ferric hydroxides. Using empirically derived microfossil concentrations in a deep-sea drill core, we deduce a conservative estimate of the {sup 60}Fe fraction as {sup 60}Fe/Fe Almost-Equal-To 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15}. This value sits comfortably within the sensitivity limit of present accelerator mass spectrometry capabilities.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James Franck Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22075794
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1484; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: Conference on origin of matter and evolution of galaxies 2011, Wako (Japan), 14-17 Nov 2011; Other Information: (c) 2012 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; AGE ESTIMATION; BACTERIA; DRILL CORES; FERRITES; IRON; IRON 60; IRON HYDROXIDES; IRON OXIDES; MAGNETITE; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; OCEANIC CRUST; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; SUPERNOVAE; UPTAKE

Citation Formats

Bishop, S., Ludwig, P., Egli, R., Faestermann, T., Korschinek, G., Rugel, G., Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Theresienstrasse 41 80333 Munich, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James Franck Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstra. 400, D-01328 Dresden. Search for supernova {sup 60}Fe in the Earth's microfossil record. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4763374.
Bishop, S., Ludwig, P., Egli, R., Faestermann, T., Korschinek, G., Rugel, G., Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Theresienstrasse 41 80333 Munich, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James Franck Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, & Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstra. 400, D-01328 Dresden. Search for supernova {sup 60}Fe in the Earth's microfossil record. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4763374.
Bishop, S., Ludwig, P., Egli, R., Faestermann, T., Korschinek, G., Rugel, G., Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Theresienstrasse 41 80333 Munich, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James Franck Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstra. 400, D-01328 Dresden. Mon . "Search for supernova {sup 60}Fe in the Earth's microfossil record". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4763374.
@article{osti_22075794,
title = {Search for supernova {sup 60}Fe in the Earth's microfossil record},
author = {Bishop, S. and Ludwig, P. and Egli, R. and Faestermann, T. and Korschinek, G. and Rugel, G. and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Theresienstrasse 41 80333 Munich and Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James Franck Str. 1, D-85748 Garching and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstra. 400, D-01328 Dresden},
abstractNote = {Approximately 2.8 Myr before the present our planet was subjected to the debris of a supernova explosion. The terrestrial proxy for this event was the discovery of live atoms of {sup 60}Fe in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust. The signature for this supernova event should also reside in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) microfossils produced by magnetotactic bacteria extant at the time of the Earth-supernova interaction, provided the bacteria preferentially uptake iron from fine-grained iron oxides and ferric hydroxides. Using empirically derived microfossil concentrations in a deep-sea drill core, we deduce a conservative estimate of the {sup 60}Fe fraction as {sup 60}Fe/Fe Almost-Equal-To 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15}. This value sits comfortably within the sensitivity limit of present accelerator mass spectrometry capabilities.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4763374},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = 1,
volume = 1484,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}