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Title: Percolation of secret correlations in a network

Abstract

In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain)
  2. (United States) and Max-Planck Institut fur Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22068674
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: (c) 2011 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: Syrian Arab Republic
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; CORRELATIONS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; TOPOLOGY

Citation Formats

Leverrier, Anthony, Garcia-Patron, Raul, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139. Percolation of secret correlations in a network. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.032329.
Leverrier, Anthony, Garcia-Patron, Raul, & Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139. Percolation of secret correlations in a network. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.032329.
Leverrier, Anthony, Garcia-Patron, Raul, and Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139. 2011. "Percolation of secret correlations in a network". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.032329.
@article{osti_22068674,
title = {Percolation of secret correlations in a network},
author = {Leverrier, Anthony and Garcia-Patron, Raul and Research Laboratory of Electronics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139},
abstractNote = {In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks--more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that entanglement percolation in quantum networks can display a highly nontrivial behavior depending on the topology of the network and on the presence of entanglement between the nodes. Here we show that this behavior, thought to be of a genuine quantum nature, also occurs in a classical context.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.84.032329},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 3,
volume = 84,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 9
}
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