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Title: Uteroenteric Fistula Resulting From Fibroid Expulsion After Uterine Fibroid Embolization: Case Report and Review of the Literature

Abstract

A 44-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for menstrual and bulk-related symptoms in an enlarged, myomatous uterus. After surgery, she spontaneously sloughed a large mass of fibroids that arrested in the cervical canal during passage. Four days after gynecological extraction, she developed copious vaginal discharge that contained enteric contents. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a fistula between the small bowel and the uterus. She subsequently underwent hysterectomy, left oophorectomy, and small-bowel resection. Her postoperative recovery was uneventful.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Stanford University, School of Medicine (United States)
  2. University of California at Los Angeles, Department of Radiology (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22066535
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; SURGERY; SYMPTOMS; UTERUS; WOMEN

Citation Formats

Gutierrez, Luis B., E-mail: lbgutier@stanford.edu, Bansal, Anshuman K., E-mail: abansal@mednet.ucla.edu, and Hovsepian, David M., E-mail: hovsepian@stanford.edu. Uteroenteric Fistula Resulting From Fibroid Expulsion After Uterine Fibroid Embolization: Case Report and Review of the Literature. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1007/S00270-011-0318-4.
Gutierrez, Luis B., E-mail: lbgutier@stanford.edu, Bansal, Anshuman K., E-mail: abansal@mednet.ucla.edu, & Hovsepian, David M., E-mail: hovsepian@stanford.edu. Uteroenteric Fistula Resulting From Fibroid Expulsion After Uterine Fibroid Embolization: Case Report and Review of the Literature. United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-011-0318-4.
Gutierrez, Luis B., E-mail: lbgutier@stanford.edu, Bansal, Anshuman K., E-mail: abansal@mednet.ucla.edu, and Hovsepian, David M., E-mail: hovsepian@stanford.edu. 2012. "Uteroenteric Fistula Resulting From Fibroid Expulsion After Uterine Fibroid Embolization: Case Report and Review of the Literature". United States. doi:10.1007/S00270-011-0318-4.
@article{osti_22066535,
title = {Uteroenteric Fistula Resulting From Fibroid Expulsion After Uterine Fibroid Embolization: Case Report and Review of the Literature},
author = {Gutierrez, Luis B., E-mail: lbgutier@stanford.edu and Bansal, Anshuman K., E-mail: abansal@mednet.ucla.edu and Hovsepian, David M., E-mail: hovsepian@stanford.edu},
abstractNote = {A 44-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for menstrual and bulk-related symptoms in an enlarged, myomatous uterus. After surgery, she spontaneously sloughed a large mass of fibroids that arrested in the cervical canal during passage. Four days after gynecological extraction, she developed copious vaginal discharge that contained enteric contents. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a fistula between the small bowel and the uterus. She subsequently underwent hysterectomy, left oophorectomy, and small-bowel resection. Her postoperative recovery was uneventful.},
doi = {10.1007/S00270-011-0318-4},
journal = {Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology},
number = 5,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month =
}
  • Purpose: To compare the status of uterine and ovarian arteries after uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients with incomplete and complete fibroid infarction via unenhanced 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five consecutive women (mean age 43 years; range 26-52 years) with symptomatic uterine fibroids underwent UAE and MR imaging before and within 2 months after UAE. The patients were divided into incomplete and complete fibroid infarction groups on the basis of the postprocedural gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging findings. Two independent observers reviewed unenhanced MR angiography before and after UAE to determine bilateral uterine and ovarian arterial flowmore » scores. The total arterial flow scores were calculated by summing the scores of the 4 arteries. All scores were compared with the Mann-Whitney test. Results: Fourteen and 21 patients were assigned to the incomplete and complete fibroid infarction groups, respectively. The total arterial flow score in the incomplete fibroid infarction group was significantly greater than that in the complete fibroid infarction group (P = 0.019 and P = 0.038 for observers 1 and 2, respectively). In 3 patients, additional therapy was recommended for insufficient fibroid infarction. In 1 of the 3 patients, bilateral ovarian arteries were invisible before UAE but seemed enlarged after UAE. Conclusion: The total arterial flow from bilateral uterine and ovarian arteries in patients with incomplete fibroid infarction is less well reduced than in those with complete fibroid infarction. Postprocedural MR angiography provides useful information to estimate the cause of insufficient fibroid infarction in individual cases.« less
  • Purpose: We have observed significant rates of uterine artery patency after uterine artery embolization (UAE) with nonspherical polyvinyl alcohol (nsPVA) on 6 month follow-up MR scanning. The study aim was to quantitatively assess uterine artery patency after UAE with nsPVA and to assess the effect of continued uterine artery patency on outcomes. Methods: A single centre, retrospective study of 50 patients undergoing bilateral UAE for uterine leiomyomata was undertaken. Pelvic MRI was performed before and 6 months after UAE. All embolizations were performed with nsPVA. Outcome measures included uterine artery patency, uterine and dominant fibroid volume, dominant fibroid percentage infarction,more » presence of ovarian arterial collaterals, and symptom scores assessed by the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire (UFS-QOL). Results: Magnetic resonance angiographic evidence of uterine artery recanalization was demonstrated in 90 % of the patients (64 % bilateral, 26 % unilateral) at 6 months. Eighty percent of all dominant fibroids demonstrated >90 % infarction. The mean percentage reduction in dominant fibroid volume was 35 %. No significant difference was identified between nonpatent, unilateral, and bilateral recanalization of the uterine arteries with regard to percentage dominant fibroid infarction or dominant fibroid volume reduction. The presence of bilaterally or unilaterally patent uterine arteries was not associated with inferior clinical outcomes (symptom score or UFS-QOL scores) at 6 months. Conclusion: The high rates of uterine artery patency challenge the current paradigm that nsPVA is a permanent embolic agent and that permanent uterine artery occlusion is necessary to optimally treat uterine fibroids. Despite high rates of uterine artery recanalization in this cohort, satisfactory fibroid infarction rates and UFS-QOL scores were achieved.« less
  • Arteriovenous fistulas between the aorta and the azygous vein usually manifest as a continuous audible murmur mimicking a patent ductus arteriosus when observed at birth. Symptoms when present during childhood are related to dyspnea or cardiac insufficiency. Embolotherapy of congenital vascular malformations is possible. However when this less invasive treatment fails, surgical treatment is sometimes necessary. We describe the case of a 12-year-old child with a large thoracic arteriovenous fistula between the descending thoracic aorta and the azygous vein, which was closed successfully by coil embolization. Available data in the literature suggest that coil embolization of aorto-azygous fistulas is usuallymore » successful.« less
  • We report a case of an intrahepatic arterioportal fistula in a 61-year-old female liver transplant recipient. The patient presented with massive ascites 7 months after a percutaneous liver biopsy. A large fistula between the right hepatic artery and the right portal vein was diagnosed on color Doppler ultrasound and confirmed on arteriography. The fistula was successfully embolized with the detachable balloon technique and the ascites resolved. Symptomatic intrahepatic arterioportal fistula in a liver transplant recipient following percutaneous biopsy is rare. Clinical manifestations, surgical or endovascular therapy, and outcome are discussed. The literature on this subject is reviewed.
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fibroid morphology in a cohort of women achieving pregnancy following treatment with uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic uterine fibroids. A retrospective review of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the uterus was performed to assess pre-embolization fibroid morphology. Data were collected on fibroid size, type, and number and included analysis of follow-up imaging to assess response. There have been 67 pregnancies in 51 women, with 40 live births. Intramural fibroids were seen in 62.7% of the women (32/48). Of these the fibroids were multiple in 16. A further 12 women hadmore » submucosal fibroids, with equal numbers of types 1 and 2. Two of these women had coexistent intramural fibroids. In six women the fibroids could not be individually delineated and formed a complex mass. All subtypes of fibroid were represented in those subgroups of women achieving a live birth versus those who did not. These results demonstrate that the location of uterine fibroids did not adversely affect subsequent pregnancy in the patient population investigated. Although this is only a small qualitative study, it does suggest that all types of fibroids treated with UAE have the potential for future fertility.« less