skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring

Abstract

Two vertical cosmic ray telescopes for atmospheric cosmic ray ionization event detection are compared. Counter A, designed for low power remote use, was deployed in the Welsh mountains; its event rate increased with altitude as expected from atmospheric cosmic ray absorption. Independently, Counter B's event rate was found to vary with incoming particle acceptance angle. Simultaneous co-located comparison of both telescopes exposed to atmospheric ionization showed a linear relationship between their event rates.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)
  2. Meteorology Department, University of Reading, PO Box 243, Earley Gate, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22066277
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Review of Scientific Instruments; Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION; ALTITUDE; COSMIC RADIATION; COSMIC RAY PROPAGATION; IONIZATION; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Aplin, K. L., and Harrison, R. G.. Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3514986.
Aplin, K. L., & Harrison, R. G.. Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3514986.
Aplin, K. L., and Harrison, R. G.. 2010. "Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3514986.
@article{osti_22066277,
title = {Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring},
author = {Aplin, K. L. and Harrison, R. G.},
abstractNote = {Two vertical cosmic ray telescopes for atmospheric cosmic ray ionization event detection are compared. Counter A, designed for low power remote use, was deployed in the Welsh mountains; its event rate increased with altitude as expected from atmospheric cosmic ray absorption. Independently, Counter B's event rate was found to vary with incoming particle acceptance angle. Simultaneous co-located comparison of both telescopes exposed to atmospheric ionization showed a linear relationship between their event rates.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3514986},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 12,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month =
}
  • An automated diode laser spectrometer for recording concentrations of trace gases is described. It has been tested for unattended operation in the laboratory and at an atmospheric surveillance station for several months. The sensitivities reached are, e.g., 50 ppt for NO{sub 2} and 300 ppt for NO. In an optical path length of 100 m the lowest extinction measured in unattended operation is {similar to}1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for a measuring time of {similar to}60 s. Recordings of trace gases are shown for urban and rural atmospheric conditions.
  • Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants while reducing the inspection effort is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One requirement of such a monitor is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from 235U. The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe, which can be obtained by a transmission or pressure measurement. Here, we describe our research to develop such amore » passive measurement system. Unfortunately, a complication arises in the interpretation of the gamma measurements, from the contribution of uranium deposits on the wall of the pipe to the 186-keV peak. A multi-detector approach to address this complication is presented where two measurements, one with signal primarily from gas and one with signal primarily from deposits, are performed simultaneously with different detectors and geometries. This allows a correction to be made to the 186-keV peak for the contribution from the deposit. Finally, we present the design of the multi-detector system and the results of the experimental calibration of the proof-of-principle prototype built at LANL.« less
  • A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV–1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use ofmore » the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.« less
  • D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab ismore » illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.« less