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Title: Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes

Abstract

Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are very important materials due to their combination of unique structure, dimension, strength, chemical stability, and electronic properties. Nevertheless, SWCNTs from commercial sources usually contain several impurities, which are usually removed by a purification process that includes reflux in acids and strong oxidation. This strong chemical procedure may alter the nanotube properties and it is thus important to control the extent of functionalization and oxidation during the purification procedure. In this report, we provide a comprehensive study of the structure and physical composition of SWCNTs during each step of the purification process. Techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy were used to track the SWCNTs structure, in terms of length and diameter distribution, and surface chemical modifications during each purification stage.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ;  [3];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Department of Chemistry, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico)
  2. (Puerto Rico)
  3. NASA John H. Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22066150
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials Characterization; Journal Volume: 60; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; CARBON; INFRARED SPECTRA; MODIFICATIONS; NANOTUBES; OXIDATION; PHASE STABILITY; PURIFICATION; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SURFACES; THERMAL GRAVIMETRIC ANALYSIS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Rosario-Castro, Belinda I., Contes, Enid J., University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346, Lebron-Colon, Marisabel, Meador, Michael A., Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346, Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@upr.edu, and University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346. Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2009.07.001.
Rosario-Castro, Belinda I., Contes, Enid J., University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346, Lebron-Colon, Marisabel, Meador, Michael A., Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346, Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@upr.edu, & University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346. Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes. United States. doi:10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2009.07.001.
Rosario-Castro, Belinda I., Contes, Enid J., University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346, Lebron-Colon, Marisabel, Meador, Michael A., Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346, Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@upr.edu, and University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346. 2009. "Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes". United States. doi:10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2009.07.001.
@article{osti_22066150,
title = {Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes},
author = {Rosario-Castro, Belinda I. and Contes, Enid J. and University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 and Lebron-Colon, Marisabel and Meador, Michael A. and Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie and University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346 and Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@upr.edu and University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, PO Box 23346, San Juan, 00931-3346},
abstractNote = {Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are very important materials due to their combination of unique structure, dimension, strength, chemical stability, and electronic properties. Nevertheless, SWCNTs from commercial sources usually contain several impurities, which are usually removed by a purification process that includes reflux in acids and strong oxidation. This strong chemical procedure may alter the nanotube properties and it is thus important to control the extent of functionalization and oxidation during the purification procedure. In this report, we provide a comprehensive study of the structure and physical composition of SWCNTs during each step of the purification process. Techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy were used to track the SWCNTs structure, in terms of length and diameter distribution, and surface chemical modifications during each purification stage.},
doi = {10.1016/J.MATCHAR.2009.07.001},
journal = {Materials Characterization},
number = 12,
volume = 60,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}
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  • No abstract prepared.
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