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Title: Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles

Abstract

Methods have been developed to measure in situ the dynamic impact of both road and rail vehicles on the infrastructure and the environment. The resulting data sets have been analysed to quantify the environmental impacts in a transparent manner across both modes. A primary concern is that a small number of vehicles are being operated outside safe or regulatory limits which can have a disproportionate large impact. The analysis enables the various impacts to be ranked across both modes so enabling one to discern the benefits of intermodal transport. The impact of various policy options is considered and how to identify vehicles which can be classified as environmentally friendly. This would require European agreement as many heavy goods vehicle operate across country borders.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [2]
  1. Sciotech Projects, Sciotech Office, Engineering Building, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AY (United Kingdom)
  2. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)
  3. Department for Transport, Statistics Roads Division, Gt. Minster House, 76 Marsham Street, London SW1P 4DR (United Kingdom)
  4. psiA-Consult GmbH, Lastenstrasse 38/1, A-1230 Vienna (Austria)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22058822
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; ENVIRONMENT; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; NOISE POLLUTION; RAIL TRANSPORT; ROAD TRANSPORT; VEHICLES

Citation Formats

Mayer, R.M., E-mail: r.m.mayer@reading.ac.uk, Poulikakos, L.D., E-mail: lily.poulikakos@empa.ch, Lees, A.R., E-mail: Andy.Lees@dft.gsi.gov.uk, Heutschi, K., E-mail: kurt.heutschi@empa.ch, Kalivoda, M.T., E-mail: kalivoda@psia.at, and Soltic, P., E-mail: patrik.soltic@empa.ch. Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2011.02.001.
Mayer, R.M., E-mail: r.m.mayer@reading.ac.uk, Poulikakos, L.D., E-mail: lily.poulikakos@empa.ch, Lees, A.R., E-mail: Andy.Lees@dft.gsi.gov.uk, Heutschi, K., E-mail: kurt.heutschi@empa.ch, Kalivoda, M.T., E-mail: kalivoda@psia.at, & Soltic, P., E-mail: patrik.soltic@empa.ch. Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles. United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2011.02.001.
Mayer, R.M., E-mail: r.m.mayer@reading.ac.uk, Poulikakos, L.D., E-mail: lily.poulikakos@empa.ch, Lees, A.R., E-mail: Andy.Lees@dft.gsi.gov.uk, Heutschi, K., E-mail: kurt.heutschi@empa.ch, Kalivoda, M.T., E-mail: kalivoda@psia.at, and Soltic, P., E-mail: patrik.soltic@empa.ch. 2012. "Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles". United States. doi:10.1016/J.EIAR.2011.02.001.
@article{osti_22058822,
title = {Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles},
author = {Mayer, R.M., E-mail: r.m.mayer@reading.ac.uk and Poulikakos, L.D., E-mail: lily.poulikakos@empa.ch and Lees, A.R., E-mail: Andy.Lees@dft.gsi.gov.uk and Heutschi, K., E-mail: kurt.heutschi@empa.ch and Kalivoda, M.T., E-mail: kalivoda@psia.at and Soltic, P., E-mail: patrik.soltic@empa.ch},
abstractNote = {Methods have been developed to measure in situ the dynamic impact of both road and rail vehicles on the infrastructure and the environment. The resulting data sets have been analysed to quantify the environmental impacts in a transparent manner across both modes. A primary concern is that a small number of vehicles are being operated outside safe or regulatory limits which can have a disproportionate large impact. The analysis enables the various impacts to be ranked across both modes so enabling one to discern the benefits of intermodal transport. The impact of various policy options is considered and how to identify vehicles which can be classified as environmentally friendly. This would require European agreement as many heavy goods vehicle operate across country borders.},
doi = {10.1016/J.EIAR.2011.02.001},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
number = 1,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 1
}
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