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Title: Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively.more » Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ;  [4];  [5];  [4];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)
  2. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)
  3. Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)
  4. Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)
  5. Scientific Direction, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22056379
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHEMOTHERAPY; ESTROGENS; FAILURES; HAZARDS; IRRADIATION; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RECEPTORS

Citation Formats

Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com, Durofil, Elena, Polesel, Jerry, Roncadin, Mario, Perin, Tiziana, Mileto, Mario, Piccoli, Erica, Quitadamo, Daniela, Massarut, Samuele, Carbone, Antonino, and Trovo, Mauro G. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.12.050.
Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com, Durofil, Elena, Polesel, Jerry, Roncadin, Mario, Perin, Tiziana, Mileto, Mario, Piccoli, Erica, Quitadamo, Daniela, Massarut, Samuele, Carbone, Antonino, & Trovo, Mauro G. Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.12.050.
Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com, Durofil, Elena, Polesel, Jerry, Roncadin, Mario, Perin, Tiziana, Mileto, Mario, Piccoli, Erica, Quitadamo, Daniela, Massarut, Samuele, Carbone, Antonino, and Trovo, Mauro G. 2012. "Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.12.050.
@article{osti_22056379,
title = {Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?},
author = {Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com and Durofil, Elena and Polesel, Jerry and Roncadin, Mario and Perin, Tiziana and Mileto, Mario and Piccoli, Erica and Quitadamo, Daniela and Massarut, Samuele and Carbone, Antonino and Trovo, Mauro G.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.12.050},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 83,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 6
}
  • Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonalmore » therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered for PMRT.« less
  • Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results:more » Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.« less
  • Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxanemore » chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.« less
  • Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite moremore » advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.« less
  • Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non-SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%),more » IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM-IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM-IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.« less