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Title: Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

Abstract

Purpose: Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) allows more precise localization of the prostate, thus minimizing errors resulting from organ motion and set-up during treatment of prostate cancer. Using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT), references such as bones, the prostate itself or implanted fiducial markers can be used as surrogates to correct patient positioning immediately before each treatment fraction. However, the use of fiducials requires an invasive procedure and may increase costs. We aimed to assess whether intra- or periprostatic calcifications (IPC) could be used as natural fiducials. Methods and Materials: Data on patients treated with IGRT for prostate cancer with clearly visible IPC and implanted fiducials in both planning CT and MVCBCT images were reviewed. IPC were classified as central when inside the prostate and peripheral when within the planning target volume. Daily deviations in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions from baseline positioning using fiducials and using IPC were compared. Results: A total of 287 MVCBCT images were obtained and analyzed from 10 patients. The mean {+-} standard deviation daily deviation (mm) in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates were 0.55 {+-} 3.11, 0.58 {+-} 3.45, and -0.54 {+-} 4.03, respectively, for fiducials, and 0.72 {+-} 3.22, 0.63 {+-} 3.58, and -0.69more » {+-} 4.26, for IPC. The p values for comparisons (fiducials vs. IPC) were 0.003, 0.653, and 0.078 for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates, respectively. When cases with central IPC were analyzed (n = 7), no significant difference was found in such comparisons. Central IPC and fiducials exhibited a similar pattern of displacement during treatment, with equal values for daily displacements in the three directions for more than 90% of measurements. Conclusions: Our data suggest that centrally located IPC may be used as natural fiducials for treatment positioning during IGRT for prostate cancer, with potential reductions in the risks and costs associated with fiducial implantation.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22056119
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; HAZARDS; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PLANNING; PROSTATE; RADIOTHERAPY; SKELETON

Citation Formats

Hanna, Samir Abdallah, E-mail: samir.hanna@hsl.org.br, Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta, Marta, Gustavo Nader, Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil, and Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis. Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.03.059.
Hanna, Samir Abdallah, E-mail: samir.hanna@hsl.org.br, Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta, Marta, Gustavo Nader, Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil, & Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis. Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.03.059.
Hanna, Samir Abdallah, E-mail: samir.hanna@hsl.org.br, Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta, Marta, Gustavo Nader, Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil, and Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis. 2012. "Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.03.059.
@article{osti_22056119,
title = {Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer},
author = {Hanna, Samir Abdallah, E-mail: samir.hanna@hsl.org.br and Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta and Marta, Gustavo Nader and Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil and Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) allows more precise localization of the prostate, thus minimizing errors resulting from organ motion and set-up during treatment of prostate cancer. Using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT), references such as bones, the prostate itself or implanted fiducial markers can be used as surrogates to correct patient positioning immediately before each treatment fraction. However, the use of fiducials requires an invasive procedure and may increase costs. We aimed to assess whether intra- or periprostatic calcifications (IPC) could be used as natural fiducials. Methods and Materials: Data on patients treated with IGRT for prostate cancer with clearly visible IPC and implanted fiducials in both planning CT and MVCBCT images were reviewed. IPC were classified as central when inside the prostate and peripheral when within the planning target volume. Daily deviations in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions from baseline positioning using fiducials and using IPC were compared. Results: A total of 287 MVCBCT images were obtained and analyzed from 10 patients. The mean {+-} standard deviation daily deviation (mm) in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates were 0.55 {+-} 3.11, 0.58 {+-} 3.45, and -0.54 {+-} 4.03, respectively, for fiducials, and 0.72 {+-} 3.22, 0.63 {+-} 3.58, and -0.69 {+-} 4.26, for IPC. The p values for comparisons (fiducials vs. IPC) were 0.003, 0.653, and 0.078 for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates, respectively. When cases with central IPC were analyzed (n = 7), no significant difference was found in such comparisons. Central IPC and fiducials exhibited a similar pattern of displacement during treatment, with equal values for daily displacements in the three directions for more than 90% of measurements. Conclusions: Our data suggest that centrally located IPC may be used as natural fiducials for treatment positioning during IGRT for prostate cancer, with potential reductions in the risks and costs associated with fiducial implantation.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2011.03.059},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 82,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 3
}
  • Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using calcifications as surrogates for the prostate position during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The twice-weekly CBCT images taken during the treatment course of 4 patients were retrospectively studied for the stability of the calcifications. The geometric center of three fiducial markers was used as the reference. The planning CT images of 131 prostate patients recently treated with external beam radiotherapy at our center were reviewed to estimate the calcification occurrence rate. Analysis was conducted using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Two patients were treated using prostate calcifications asmore » the landmark in on-line registration. Both the Varian standard and the low-dose CBCT modes were used for imaging. Results: The calcifications were found to be stable during the treatment course. At the 95% confidence interval, the difference between the distance from an identified calcification to the fiducial markers on CBCT and the distance on the planning CT scans was 0.2 {+-} 2.0 mm, 0.8 {+-} 2.2 mm, and 0.4 {+-} 2.4 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior direction, respectively. Of the 131 patients, 46 (35%) had well-defined calcifications either inside the prostate or near the borders. Our experience in treating the first 2 patients demonstrated that the calcifications are easily distinguished on low-dose scans and that calcification registration can be precisely performed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that calcifications can be reliable markers of prostate position and allow for precise image guidance with a low-imaging dose. With this approach, potentially about one-third of prostate patients could benefit from precise image guidance without the invasive use of markers.« less
  • Purpose: For patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, the seminal vesicles (SVs) are included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purposes of this study are to investigate interfraction motion characteristics of the SVs and determine proper margins for online computed tomography image guidance. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients, each with 16 daily helical computed tomography scans, were included in this study. A binary image mask was used for image registration to determine daily organ motion. Two online image-guided radiotherapy strategies (prostate only and prostate + SVs) were simulated in a hypofractionated scheme. Three margin designs were studied formore » both three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In prostate-only guidance, Margin A was uniformly applied to the whole CTV, and Margin B was applied to the SVs with a fixed 3-mm prostate margin. In prostate plus SV guidance, Margin C was uniformly applied to the CTV. The minimum margins were sought to satisfy the criterion that minimum cumulative CTV dose be more than those of the planning target volume in the plan for greater than 95% of patients. Results: The prostate and SVs move significantly more in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior than right-left directions. The anterior-posterior motion of the prostate and SVs correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.7). The SVs move significantly more than the prostate. The minimum margins found were 2.5 mm for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 4.5, 4.5, and 3.0 mm for Margins A, B, and C for IMRT, respectively. Margins for IMRT were larger, but the irradiated volume and doses to critical structures were smaller. Minimum margins of 4.5 mm to the SVs and 3 mm to the prostate are recommended for IMRT with prostate-only guidance. Conclusions: The SVs move independently from the prostate gland, and additional margins are necessary for image-guided radiotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Multiple studies have indicated that the prostate is not stationary and can move as much as 2 cm. Such prostate movements are problematic for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with its associated tight margins and dose escalation. Because of these intrinsic daily uncertainties, a relative generous 'margin' is necessary to avoid marginal misses. Using the CT-linear accelerator combination in the treatment suite (Primatom, Siemens), we found that the daily intrinsic prostate movements can be easily corrected before each radiotherapy session. Dosimetric calculations were performed to evaluate the amount of discrepancy of dose to the target if no correction was done for prostatemore » movement. Methods and materials: The Primatom consists of a Siemens Somatom CT scanner and a Siemens Primus linear accelerator installed in the same treatment suite and sharing a common table/couch. The patient is scanned by the CT scanner, which is movable on a pair of horizontal rails. During scanning, the couch does not move. The exact location of the prostate, seminal vesicles, and rectum are identified and localized. These positions are then compared with the planned positions. The daily movement of the prostate and rectum were corrected for and a new isocenter derived. The patient was treated immediately using the new isocenter. Results: Of the 108 patients with primary prostate cancer studied, 540 consecutive daily CT scans were performed during the last part of the cone down treatment. Of the 540 scans, 46% required no isocenter adjustments for the AP-PA direction, 54% required a shift of {>=}3 mm, 44% required a shift of >5 mm, and 15% required a shift of >10 mm. In the superoinferior direction, 27% required a shift of >3 mm, 25% required a shift of >5 mm, and 4% required a shift of >10 mm. In the right-left direction, 34% required a shift of >3 mm, 24% required a shift of >5 mm, and 5% required a shift of >10 mm. Dosimetric calculations for a typical case of prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with 5-mm margin coverage from the clinical target volume (prostate gland) was performed. With a posterior shift of 10 mm for the prostate, the dose coverage dropped from 95-107% to 71-100% coverage. Conclusion: We have described a technique that corrects for the daily prostate motion, allowing for extremely precise prostate cancer treatment. This technique has significant implications for dose escalation and for decreasing rectal complications in the treatment of prostate cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shiftsmore » of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.« less
  • Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent.Methods: The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration.Results: In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm andmore » visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.45 Degree-Sign and a translation error of 1.67 {+-} 2.24 mm.Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.« less