skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation

Abstract

Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit mostmore » from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, ACTREC/TMH, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22056029
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BRAIN; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; CT-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY; DISEASE INCIDENCE; EVALUATION; IMAGES; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; SKULL; STANDARDS

Citation Formats

Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com, Wadasadawala, Tabassum, Master, Zubin, Phurailatpam, Reena, Pai-Shetty, Rajershi, and Jalali, Rakesh. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2010.12.044.
Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com, Wadasadawala, Tabassum, Master, Zubin, Phurailatpam, Reena, Pai-Shetty, Rajershi, & Jalali, Rakesh. Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2010.12.044.
Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com, Wadasadawala, Tabassum, Master, Zubin, Phurailatpam, Reena, Pai-Shetty, Rajershi, and Jalali, Rakesh. 2012. "Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2010.12.044.
@article{osti_22056029,
title = {Encouraging Early Clinical Outcomes With Helical Tomotherapy-Based Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Residual, Recurrent, and/or Progressive Benign/Low-Grade Intracranial Tumors: A Comprehensive Evaluation},
author = {Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com and Wadasadawala, Tabassum and Master, Zubin and Phurailatpam, Reena and Pai-Shetty, Rajershi and Jalali, Rakesh},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in brain tumors of varying shape, size, and location. Materials and Methods: Patients with residual, recurrent, and/or progressive low-grade intracranial and skull-base tumors were treated on a prospective protocol of HT-based IMRT and followed clinicoradiologically. Standardized metrics were used for plan evaluation and outcome analysis. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 30 lesions were treated to a median radiotherapy dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions. All HT plans resulted in excellent target volume coverage with steep dose-gradients. The mean (standard deviation) dose homogeneity index and conformity index was 0.07 (0.05) and 0.71 (0.08) respectively. At first response assessment, 20 of 30 lesions were stable, whereas 9 showed partial regression. One patient with a recurrent clival chordoma though neurologically stable showed imaging-defined progression, whereas another patient with stable disease on serial imaging had sustained neurologic worsening. With a median follow-up of 19 months (interquartile range, 11-26 months), the 2-year clinicoradiological progression-free survival and overall survival was 93.3% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: Careful selection of radiotherapy technique is warranted for benign/low-grade brain tumors to achieve durable local control with minimum long-term morbidity. Large or complex-shaped tumors benefit most from IMRT. Our early clinical experience of HT-based IMRT for brain tumors has been encouraging.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2010.12.044},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 82,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 2
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) tomore » be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.« less
  • Purpose: To report, from a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data, on the feasibility, outcome, toxicity, and voice-handicap index (VHI) of patients with T1a glottic cancer treated by a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy technique developed at our institution to treat only the involved vocal cord: single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with T1a glottic cancer were treated by means of SVCI. Dose prescription was set to 16 × 3.63 Gy (total dose 58.08 Gy). The clinical target volume was the entire vocal cord. Setup verification was done by means of an online correction protocol using cone beam computed tomography. Datamore » for voice quality assessment were collected prospectively at baseline, end of treatment, and 4, 6, and 12 weeks and 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment using VHI questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 7-50 months), the 2-year local control and overall survival rates were 100% and 90% because no single local recurrence was reported and 3 patients died because of comorbidity. All patients have completed the intended treatment schedule; no treatment interruptions and no grade 3 acute toxicity were reported. Grade 2 acute dermatitis or dysphagia was reported in only 5 patients (17%). No serious late toxicity was reported; only 1 patient developed temporary grade 2 laryngeal edema, and responded to a short-course of corticosteroid. The VHI improved significantly, from 33.5 at baseline to 9.5 and 10 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively (P<.001). The control group, treated to the whole larynx, had comparable local control rates (92.2% vs 100%, P=.24) but more acute toxicity (66% vs 17%, P<.0001) and higher VHI scores (23.8 and 16.7 at 6 weeks and 18 months, respectively, P<.0001). Conclusion: Single vocal cord irradiation is feasible and resulted in maximal local control rate at 2 years. The deterioration in VHI scores was slight and temporary and subsequently improved to normal levels. Long-term follow-up is needed to consolidate these promising results.« less
  • Purpose: Intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after initial treatment remains a dominant cause of death. We report our experience using proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for reirradiation in such cases, focusing on patterns of failure, criteria for patient selection, and predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients underwent reirradiation for intrathoracic recurrent NSCLC at a single institution. All doses were recalculated to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2). All patients had received radiation therapy for NSCLC (median initial dose of 70 EQD2 Gy), with median interval to reirradiation ofmore » 17 months and median reirradiation dose of 60.48 EQD2 Gy. Median follow-up time was 6.5 months (range, 0-72 months). Results: Ninety-nine patients (97%) completed reirradiation. Median local failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival times were 11.43 months (range, 8.6-22.66 months), 11.43 months (range, 6.83-23.84 months), and 14.71 (range, 10.34-20.56 months), respectively. Toxicity was acceptable, with rates of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity of 7% and grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity of 10%. Of the patients who developed local failure after reirradiation, 88% had failure in either the original or the reirradiation field. Poor local control was associated with T4 disease, squamous histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score >1. Concurrent chemotherapy improved DMFS, but T4 disease was associated with poor DMFS. Higher T status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥1, squamous histology, and larger reirradiation target volumes led to worse overall survival; receipt of concurrent chemotherapy and higher EQD2 were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton beam therapy are options for treating recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. However, rates of locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis are high, and patients should be selected carefully to maximize the benefit of additional aggressive local therapy while minimizing the risk of adverse side effects.« less
  • Purpose: To investigate the roles of volumetric modulated arc therapy with SmartArc (VMAT-S), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for oropharyngeal cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT were selected at random. Plans were computed for both IMRT and VMAT-S (using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta Infinity linac) along with HT. A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high-risk, and microscopic low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volumemore » histogram data, monitor units per fraction (MU/fx), and delivery time. Results: VMAT-S target coverage was close to that achieved by IMRT, but inferior to HT. The conformity and homogeneity within the PTV were improved for HT over all strategies. Sparing of the organs at risk (OAR) was achieved with all modalities. VMAT-S (along with HT) shortened delivery time (mean, -38%) and reduced MU/fx (mean, -28%) compared with IMRT. Conclusion: VMAT-S represents an attractive solution because of the shorter delivery time and the lower number of MU/fx compared with IMRT. However, in this complex clinical setting, current VMAT-S does not appear to provide any distinct advantage compared with helical tomotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for local control of tumors metastatic to the liver. Multi-institutional Phase II trials are examining 60 Gy in 3 fractions delivered by linac-based, 3D-conformal IMRT. HiArt Helical TomoTherapy is a treatment unit that delivers co-planar helical IMRT that is capable of image-guided SBRT. We hypothesized that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) delivered to a lesion by Helical TomoTherapy-based SBRT could be predicted based on the planning target volume (PTV) and liver volume. Methods and Materials: To test this, we performed inverse treatment planning and analyzedmore » the dosimetry for multiple hypothetical liver gross tumor volumes (GTV) with conventional PTV expansions. Inverse planning was carried out to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy to be delivered in 3 fractions based on the dose constraint that 700 cc of normal liver would receive less than 15 Gy. Results: Regression analysis indicated a linear relationship between the MTD, the PTV and the liver volume, supporting our hypothesis. A predictive equation was generated, which was found to have an accuracy of {+-}3 Gy. In addition, dose constraints based on proximity to other normal tissues were tested. Inverse planning for PTVs located at varying distances from the heart, small bowel, and spinal cord revealed a predictable decrease in the MTD as the PTV increased in size or approached normal organs. Conclusions: These data provide a framework for predicting the likely MTD for patients considered for Helical TomoTherapy liver SBRT.« less