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Title: Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards

Abstract

Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in anmore » aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino detectors that were deployed. Finally, some preliminary results of our aboveground test will be shown. (authors)« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22039887
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ANIMMA 2011: 2. International Conference on Advancements in Nuclear Instrumentation, Measurement Methods and their Applications, Ghent (Belgium), 6-9 Jun 2011; Other Information: Country of input: France; 4 refs.; IEEE Catalog Number: CFP1124I-CDR
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; ANTINEUTRINOS; BURNUP; CONCRETES; CONTAINERS; CONTAINMENT; CONTROL SYSTEMS; INVENTORIES; MONITORING; MUONS; NUCLEAR FUELS; PWR TYPE REACTORS; REACTOR CORES; REACTOR MONITORING SYSTEMS; SAFEGUARDS; SAN ONOFRE-1 REACTOR; SCINTILLATION COUNTERS; SHIELDING; UNDERGROUND

Citation Formats

Reyna, D, Bernstein, A, Lund, J, Kiff, S, Cabrera-Palmer, B, Bowden, N S, Dazeley, S, and Keefer, G. Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1109/ANIMMA.2011.6172887.
Reyna, D, Bernstein, A, Lund, J, Kiff, S, Cabrera-Palmer, B, Bowden, N S, Dazeley, S, & Keefer, G. Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards. United States. doi:10.1109/ANIMMA.2011.6172887.
Reyna, D, Bernstein, A, Lund, J, Kiff, S, Cabrera-Palmer, B, Bowden, N S, Dazeley, S, and Keefer, G. Fri . "Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards". United States. doi:10.1109/ANIMMA.2011.6172887.
@article{osti_22039887,
title = {Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards},
author = {Reyna, D and Bernstein, A and Lund, J and Kiff, S and Cabrera-Palmer, B and Bowden, N S and Dazeley, S and Keefer, G},
abstractNote = {Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in an aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino detectors that were deployed. Finally, some preliminary results of our aboveground test will be shown. (authors)},
doi = {10.1109/ANIMMA.2011.6172887},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}

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