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Title: TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY

Abstract

We use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host-galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light curves using both MLCS2K2 and SALT2, and determine color (A{sub V} , c) and light-curve shape ({Delta}, x{sub 1}) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4{sigma} level) finding is that the average fitted A{sub V} from MLCS2K2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that supernovae (SNe) in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light curvesmore » if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ;  [2];  [3]; ;  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12]; ; ; ;  [13] more »; « less
  1. Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)
  3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)
  4. Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)
  5. Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellise Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)
  6. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)
  7. Center for Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)
  8. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)
  10. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)
  11. Department of Physics, University of Western Cape, Bellville 7535, Cape Town (South Africa)
  12. Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)
  13. Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22039070
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 755; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; COLOR; CORRELATIONS; DIAGRAMS; DISTANCE; MILKY WAY; MORPHOLOGY; PHOTOMETRY; RED SHIFT; SUPERNOVAE; VISIBLE RADIATION

Citation Formats

Galbany, Lluis, Miquel, Ramon, Oestman, Linda, Brown, Peter J., Olmstead, Matthew D., Cinabro, David, D'Andrea, Chris B., Nichol, Robert C., Frieman, Joshua, Jha, Saurabh W., Marriner, John, Nordin, Jakob, Sako, Masao, Schneider, Donald P., Smith, Mathew, Sollerman, Jesper, Pan, Kaike, Snedden, Stephanie, Bizyaev, Dmitry, Brewington, Howard, E-mail: lluis.galbany@ist.utl.pt, and and others. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/755/2/125.
Galbany, Lluis, Miquel, Ramon, Oestman, Linda, Brown, Peter J., Olmstead, Matthew D., Cinabro, David, D'Andrea, Chris B., Nichol, Robert C., Frieman, Joshua, Jha, Saurabh W., Marriner, John, Nordin, Jakob, Sako, Masao, Schneider, Donald P., Smith, Mathew, Sollerman, Jesper, Pan, Kaike, Snedden, Stephanie, Bizyaev, Dmitry, Brewington, Howard, E-mail: lluis.galbany@ist.utl.pt, & and others. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/755/2/125.
Galbany, Lluis, Miquel, Ramon, Oestman, Linda, Brown, Peter J., Olmstead, Matthew D., Cinabro, David, D'Andrea, Chris B., Nichol, Robert C., Frieman, Joshua, Jha, Saurabh W., Marriner, John, Nordin, Jakob, Sako, Masao, Schneider, Donald P., Smith, Mathew, Sollerman, Jesper, Pan, Kaike, Snedden, Stephanie, Bizyaev, Dmitry, Brewington, Howard, E-mail: lluis.galbany@ist.utl.pt, and and others. 2012. "TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/755/2/125.
@article{osti_22039070,
title = {TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROPERTIES AS A FUNCTION OF THE DISTANCE TO THE HOST GALAXY IN THE SDSS-II SN SURVEY},
author = {Galbany, Lluis and Miquel, Ramon and Oestman, Linda and Brown, Peter J. and Olmstead, Matthew D. and Cinabro, David and D'Andrea, Chris B. and Nichol, Robert C. and Frieman, Joshua and Jha, Saurabh W. and Marriner, John and Nordin, Jakob and Sako, Masao and Schneider, Donald P. and Smith, Mathew and Sollerman, Jesper and Pan, Kaike and Snedden, Stephanie and Bizyaev, Dmitry and Brewington, Howard, E-mail: lluis.galbany@ist.utl.pt and and others},
abstractNote = {We use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host-galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light curves using both MLCS2K2 and SALT2, and determine color (A{sub V} , c) and light-curve shape ({Delta}, x{sub 1}) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4{sigma} level) finding is that the average fitted A{sub V} from MLCS2K2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that supernovae (SNe) in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/755/2/125},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 755,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 8
}
  • We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, asmore » well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.« less
  • Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Supernova Survey-II (SDSS-II SN Survey), we measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of galaxy properties at intermediate redshift. A sample of 342 SNe Ia with 0.05 < z < 0.25 is constructed. Using broadband photometry and redshifts, we use the PEGASE.2 spectral energy distributions to estimate host galaxy stellar masses and recent star formation rates (SFRs). We find that the rate of SNe Ia per unit stellar mass is significantly higher (by a factor of {approx}30) in highly star-forming galaxies compared to passive galaxies. When parameterizing themore » SN Ia rate (SNR{sub Ia}) based on host galaxy properties, we find that the rate of SNe Ia in passive galaxies is not linearly proportional to the stellar mass; instead an SNR{sub Ia}{proportional_to}M{sup 0.68} is favored. However, such a parameterization does not describe the observed SNR{sub Ia} in star-forming galaxies. The SNR{sub Ia} in star-forming galaxies is well fitted by SNR{sub Ia} = (0.41 {+-} 0.15) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sup 0.72{+-}0.15} + (0.65 {+-} 0.25) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}SFR{sup 1.01{+-}0.22} (statistical errors only), where M is the host galaxy stellar mass (in M{sub Sun }) and SFR is the SFR (in M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We show that our results, for SNe Ia in passive galaxies, are consistent with those at higher redshifts (favoring SNR{sub Ia}{proportional_to}M) when accounting for the difference in the ages of our galaxies. This suggests that the rate of SNe Ia is correlated with the age of the stellar population. The MLCS extinction parameter, A{sub V} , is similar in passive and moderately star-forming galaxies, but we find indications that it is smaller, on average, in highly star-forming galaxies. This result appears to be driven by a deficit of the reddest (A{sub V} > 0.15) SNe Ia in highly star-forming galaxies. We consider that the high levels of dust in these systems may be obscuring the reddest and faintest SNe Ia.« less
  • Using the largest single-survey sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to date, we study the relationship between properties of SNe Ia and those of their host galaxies, focusing primarily on correlations with Hubble residuals (HR). Our sample consists of 345 photometrically-classified or spectroscopicallyconfirmed SNe Ia discovered as part of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-SNS). This analysis utilizes host-galaxy spectroscopy obtained during the SDSS-I/II spectroscopic survey and from an ancillary program on the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that obtained spectra for nearly all host galaxies of SDSS-II SN candidates. In addition, we use photometric hostgalaxy properties from themore » SDSS-SNS data release (Sako et al. 2014) such as host stellar mass and star-formation rate. We confirm the well-known relation between HR and host-galaxy mass and find a 3.6σ significance of a non-zero linear slope. We also recover correlations between HR and hostgalaxy gas-phase metallicity and specific star-formation rate as they are reported in the literature. With our large dataset, we examine correlations between HR and multiple host-galaxy properties simultaneously and find no evidence of a significant correlation. We also independently analyze our spectroscopically-confirmed and photometrically-classified SNe Ia and comment on the significance of similar combined datasets for future surveys.« less
  • Studying the correlation of Type Ia supernova rates (SNRs) with host galaxy properties is an important step in understanding the exact nature of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We use SNe Ia from the SDSS-II sample, spectroscopically determined masses and star formation rates, and a new maximum likelihood method, to fit the Scannapieco and Bildsten rate model SNR = A Multiplication-Sign M + B Multiplication-Sign SFR, where M is galaxy mass and SFR is star formation rate. We find A = 3.5{sup +0.9}{sub -0.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} (SNe/yr)(M{sub Sun }){sup -1} and B = 1.3{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}more » (SNe/yr)(M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}){sup -1}, assuming overall efficiency of 0.5. This is in reasonable agreement with other determinations. However we find strong evidence that this model is a poor fit to other projections of the data: it fails to correctly predict the distribution of supernovae with host mass or SFR. An additional model parameter is required; most likely this parameter is related to host galaxy mass. Some implications of this result are discussed.« less
  • We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of SN host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Iamore » when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future analysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased toward lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.« less