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Title: Neutral atoms are entangled in hyperfine states via Rydberg blockade

Abstract

Ions and neutral atoms held in electromagnetic traps are two of many candidates that may one day become the qubits in a quantum computer: Their hyperfine states could serve as the computer's ones and zeroes. Ions interact via long-range Coulomb forces, which can facilitate creation of the entangled states that are the prerequisite for quantum computation. But that same Coulomb interaction gives rise to collective motions that can disrupt a qubit array. Atoms aren't susceptible to such disruptions. But they're also more difficult to entangle.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22038479
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physics Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 63; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: (c) 2010 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9228
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; COULOMB FIELD; INTERACTIONS; IONS; QUANTUM COMPUTERS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; QUBITS; RISE; TRAPS

Citation Formats

Miller, Johanna. Neutral atoms are entangled in hyperfine states via Rydberg blockade. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3326977.
Miller, Johanna. Neutral atoms are entangled in hyperfine states via Rydberg blockade. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3326977.
Miller, Johanna. Mon . "Neutral atoms are entangled in hyperfine states via Rydberg blockade". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3326977.
@article{osti_22038479,
title = {Neutral atoms are entangled in hyperfine states via Rydberg blockade},
author = {Miller, Johanna},
abstractNote = {Ions and neutral atoms held in electromagnetic traps are two of many candidates that may one day become the qubits in a quantum computer: Their hyperfine states could serve as the computer's ones and zeroes. Ions interact via long-range Coulomb forces, which can facilitate creation of the entangled states that are the prerequisite for quantum computation. But that same Coulomb interaction gives rise to collective motions that can disrupt a qubit array. Atoms aren't susceptible to such disruptions. But they're also more difficult to entangle.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3326977},
journal = {Physics Today},
issn = {0031-9228},
number = 2,
volume = 63,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {2}
}