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Title: THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES

Abstract

This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5 R{sub 200}, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in themore » highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]; ; ; ;  [3];  [4];  [5]; ; ;  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9]
  1. Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)
  2. Center for Time Domain Informatics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)
  3. Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)
  4. Institute of Sciences of the Cosmos (ICCUB) and IEEC, Physics Department, University of Barcelona, Barcelona 08024 (Spain)
  5. Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)
  6. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)
  7. Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)
  8. Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)
  9. Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22037120
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 752; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; CATALOGS; DENSITY; GALACTIC EVOLUTION; GALAXIES; GALAXY CLUSTERS; LUMINOSITY; MASS; STARS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Harrison, Craig D., Miller, Christopher J., Richards, Joseph W., Deadman, Paul-James, Lloyd-Davies, E. J., Kathy Romer, A., Mehrtens, Nicola, Liddle, Andrew R., Hoyle, Ben, Hilton, Matt, Stott, John P., Capozzi, Diego, Collins, Chris A., Sahlen, Martin, Stanford, S. Adam, and Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/12.
Harrison, Craig D., Miller, Christopher J., Richards, Joseph W., Deadman, Paul-James, Lloyd-Davies, E. J., Kathy Romer, A., Mehrtens, Nicola, Liddle, Andrew R., Hoyle, Ben, Hilton, Matt, Stott, John P., Capozzi, Diego, Collins, Chris A., Sahlen, Martin, Stanford, S. Adam, & Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu. THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/12.
Harrison, Craig D., Miller, Christopher J., Richards, Joseph W., Deadman, Paul-James, Lloyd-Davies, E. J., Kathy Romer, A., Mehrtens, Nicola, Liddle, Andrew R., Hoyle, Ben, Hilton, Matt, Stott, John P., Capozzi, Diego, Collins, Chris A., Sahlen, Martin, Stanford, S. Adam, and Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu. Sun . "THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/12.
@article{osti_22037120,
title = {THE XMM CLUSTER SURVEY: THE STELLAR MASS ASSEMBLY OF FOSSIL GALAXIES},
author = {Harrison, Craig D. and Miller, Christopher J. and Richards, Joseph W. and Deadman, Paul-James and Lloyd-Davies, E. J. and Kathy Romer, A. and Mehrtens, Nicola and Liddle, Andrew R. and Hoyle, Ben and Hilton, Matt and Stott, John P. and Capozzi, Diego and Collins, Chris A. and Sahlen, Martin and Stanford, S. Adam and Viana, Pedro T. P., E-mail: craigha@umich.edu},
abstractNote = {This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5 R{sub 200}, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/12},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 1,
volume = 752,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}