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Title: LONG GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM COLLAPSARS

Abstract

In the collapsar model for common gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the formation of a centrifugally supported disk occurs during the first {approx}10 s following the collapse of the iron core in a massive star. This only occurs in a small fraction of massive stellar deaths, however, and requires unusual conditions. A much more frequent occurrence could be the death of a star that makes a black hole and a weak or absent outgoing shock, but in a progenitor that only has enough angular momentum in its outermost layers to make a disk. We consider several cases where this is likely to occur-blue supergiants with low mass-loss rates, tidally interacting binaries involving either helium stars or giant stars, and the collapse to a black hole of very massive pair-instability supernovae. These events have in common the accretion of a solar mass or so of material through a disk over a period much longer than the duration of a common GRB. A broad range of powers is possible, 10{sup 47}-10{sup 50} erg s{sup -1}, and this brightness could be enhanced by beaming. Such events were probably more frequent in the early universe where mass-loss rates were lower. Indeed, this could be one ofmore » the most common forms of gamma-ray transients in the universe and could be used to study first generation stars. Several events could be active in the sky at any one time. Recent examples of this sort of event may have been the Swift transients Sw-1644+57, Sw-2058+0516, and GRB 101225A.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)
  2. Minnesota Institute of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22037097
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 752; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ANGULAR MOMENTUM; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; BLACK HOLES; BRIGHTNESS; COSMIC GAMMA BURSTS; GAMMA RADIATION; GIANT STARS; HELIUM; INSTABILITY; IRON; LAYERS; MASS; SUPERNOVAE; TRANSIENTS; UNIVERSE

Citation Formats

Woosley, S. E., and Heger, Alexander, E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.edu. LONG GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM COLLAPSARS. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/32.
Woosley, S. E., & Heger, Alexander, E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.edu. LONG GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM COLLAPSARS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/32.
Woosley, S. E., and Heger, Alexander, E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.edu. 2012. "LONG GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM COLLAPSARS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/32.
@article{osti_22037097,
title = {LONG GAMMA-RAY TRANSIENTS FROM COLLAPSARS},
author = {Woosley, S. E. and Heger, Alexander, E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.edu},
abstractNote = {In the collapsar model for common gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the formation of a centrifugally supported disk occurs during the first {approx}10 s following the collapse of the iron core in a massive star. This only occurs in a small fraction of massive stellar deaths, however, and requires unusual conditions. A much more frequent occurrence could be the death of a star that makes a black hole and a weak or absent outgoing shock, but in a progenitor that only has enough angular momentum in its outermost layers to make a disk. We consider several cases where this is likely to occur-blue supergiants with low mass-loss rates, tidally interacting binaries involving either helium stars or giant stars, and the collapse to a black hole of very massive pair-instability supernovae. These events have in common the accretion of a solar mass or so of material through a disk over a period much longer than the duration of a common GRB. A broad range of powers is possible, 10{sup 47}-10{sup 50} erg s{sup -1}, and this brightness could be enhanced by beaming. Such events were probably more frequent in the early universe where mass-loss rates were lower. Indeed, this could be one of the most common forms of gamma-ray transients in the universe and could be used to study first generation stars. Several events could be active in the sky at any one time. Recent examples of this sort of event may have been the Swift transients Sw-1644+57, Sw-2058+0516, and GRB 101225A.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/32},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 752,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 6
}
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