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Title: CHARACTERIZING SUBPOPULATIONS WITHIN THE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS WITH NEOWISE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

Abstract

We present the preliminary results of an analysis of the sub-populations within the near-Earth asteroids, including the Atens, Apollos, Amors, and those that are considered potentially hazardous using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). In order to extrapolate the sample of objects detected by WISE to the greater population, we determined the survey biases for asteroids detected by the project's automated moving object processing system (known as NEOWISE) as a function of diameter, visible albedo, and orbital elements. Using this technique, we are able to place constraints on the number of potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 100 m and find that there are {approx}4700 {+-} 1450 such objects. As expected, the Atens, Apollos, and Amors are revealed by WISE to have somewhat different albedo distributions, with the Atens being brighter than the Amors. The cumulative size distributions of the various near-Earth object (NEO) subgroups vary slightly between 100 m and 1 km. A comparison of the observed orbital elements of the various sub-populations of the NEOs with the current best model is shown.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ;  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9]
  1. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  2. Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719-2395 (United States)
  3. Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States)
  4. Minor Planet Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  5. Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)
  6. Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI (United States)
  7. Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, 200 Eighth Street, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)
  8. Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, P.O. Box 91547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)
  9. Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Box 951567, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22037016
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astrophysical Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 752; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0004-637X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ALBEDO; ASTEROIDS; ASTRONOMY; ASTROPHYSICS; CATALOGS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; INFRARED SURVEYS; PLANETS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Mainzer, A., Masiero, J., Bauer, J., Giorgini, J., Grav, T., McMillan, R. S., Spahr, T., Cutri, R. M., Tholen, D. J., Jedicke, R., Walker, R., Wright, E., and Nugent, C. R., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov. CHARACTERIZING SUBPOPULATIONS WITHIN THE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS WITH NEOWISE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/2/110.
Mainzer, A., Masiero, J., Bauer, J., Giorgini, J., Grav, T., McMillan, R. S., Spahr, T., Cutri, R. M., Tholen, D. J., Jedicke, R., Walker, R., Wright, E., & Nugent, C. R., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov. CHARACTERIZING SUBPOPULATIONS WITHIN THE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS WITH NEOWISE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/2/110.
Mainzer, A., Masiero, J., Bauer, J., Giorgini, J., Grav, T., McMillan, R. S., Spahr, T., Cutri, R. M., Tholen, D. J., Jedicke, R., Walker, R., Wright, E., and Nugent, C. R., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov. Wed . "CHARACTERIZING SUBPOPULATIONS WITHIN THE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS WITH NEOWISE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/2/110.
@article{osti_22037016,
title = {CHARACTERIZING SUBPOPULATIONS WITHIN THE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS WITH NEOWISE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS},
author = {Mainzer, A. and Masiero, J. and Bauer, J. and Giorgini, J. and Grav, T. and McMillan, R. S. and Spahr, T. and Cutri, R. M. and Tholen, D. J. and Jedicke, R. and Walker, R. and Wright, E. and Nugent, C. R., E-mail: amainzer@jpl.nasa.gov},
abstractNote = {We present the preliminary results of an analysis of the sub-populations within the near-Earth asteroids, including the Atens, Apollos, Amors, and those that are considered potentially hazardous using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). In order to extrapolate the sample of objects detected by WISE to the greater population, we determined the survey biases for asteroids detected by the project's automated moving object processing system (known as NEOWISE) as a function of diameter, visible albedo, and orbital elements. Using this technique, we are able to place constraints on the number of potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 100 m and find that there are {approx}4700 {+-} 1450 such objects. As expected, the Atens, Apollos, and Amors are revealed by WISE to have somewhat different albedo distributions, with the Atens being brighter than the Amors. The cumulative size distributions of the various near-Earth object (NEO) subgroups vary slightly between 100 m and 1 km. A comparison of the observed orbital elements of the various sub-populations of the NEOs with the current best model is shown.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/752/2/110},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
issn = {0004-637X},
number = 2,
volume = 752,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}