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Title: BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

Abstract

We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22011893
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 745; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; LUMINOSITY; MAIN SEQUENCE STARS; MASS; PLANETS; SATELLITES

Citation Formats

Rodriguez, David R., and Zuckerman, B., E-mail: drodrigu@das.uchile.cl. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/745/2/147.
Rodriguez, David R., & Zuckerman, B., E-mail: drodrigu@das.uchile.cl. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/745/2/147.
Rodriguez, David R., and Zuckerman, B., E-mail: drodrigu@das.uchile.cl. 2012. "BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/745/2/147.
@article{osti_22011893,
title = {BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS},
author = {Rodriguez, David R. and Zuckerman, B., E-mail: drodrigu@das.uchile.cl},
abstractNote = {We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/745/2/147},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 745,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 2
}
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