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Title: TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS

Abstract

Since the discovery of the first exoplanets, those most adequate for life to begin and evolve have been sought. Due to observational bias, however, most of the discovered planets so far are gas giants, precluding their habitability. However, if these hot Jupiters are located in the habitable zones of their host stars, and if rocky moons orbit them, then these moons may be habitable. In this work, we present a model for planetary transit simulation considering the presence of moons and planetary rings around a planet. The moon's orbit is considered to be circular and coplanar with the planetary orbit. The other physical and orbital parameters of the star, planet, moon, and rings can be adjusted in each simulation. It is possible to simulate as many successive transits as desired. Since the presence of spots on the surface of the star may produce a signal similar to that of the presence of a moon, our model also allows for the inclusion of starspots. The result of the simulation is a light curve with a planetary transit. White noise may also be added to the light curves to produce curves similar to those obtained by the CoRoT and Kepler space telescopes.more » The goal is to determine the criteria for detectability of moons and/or ring systems using photometry. The results show that it is possible to detect moons with radii as little as 1.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with CoRoT and 0.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with Kepler.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Astrophysics Division, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais Av. dos Astronautas, 1758 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)
  2. Center for Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mackenzie, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Rua da Consolacao, 896 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22004511
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 743; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; JUPITER PLANET; MOON; ORBITS; PHOTOMETRY; SIGNALS; STARS; STARSPOTS; TELESCOPES

Citation Formats

Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M., and Valio, Adriana, E-mail: lrtusnski@das.inpe.br, E-mail: avalio@craam.mackenzie.br. TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/97.
Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M., & Valio, Adriana, E-mail: lrtusnski@das.inpe.br, E-mail: avalio@craam.mackenzie.br. TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/97.
Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M., and Valio, Adriana, E-mail: lrtusnski@das.inpe.br, E-mail: avalio@craam.mackenzie.br. Sat . "TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/97.
@article{osti_22004511,
title = {TRANSIT MODEL OF PLANETS WITH MOON AND RING SYSTEMS},
author = {Tusnski, Luis Ricardo M. and Valio, Adriana, E-mail: lrtusnski@das.inpe.br, E-mail: avalio@craam.mackenzie.br},
abstractNote = {Since the discovery of the first exoplanets, those most adequate for life to begin and evolve have been sought. Due to observational bias, however, most of the discovered planets so far are gas giants, precluding their habitability. However, if these hot Jupiters are located in the habitable zones of their host stars, and if rocky moons orbit them, then these moons may be habitable. In this work, we present a model for planetary transit simulation considering the presence of moons and planetary rings around a planet. The moon's orbit is considered to be circular and coplanar with the planetary orbit. The other physical and orbital parameters of the star, planet, moon, and rings can be adjusted in each simulation. It is possible to simulate as many successive transits as desired. Since the presence of spots on the surface of the star may produce a signal similar to that of the presence of a moon, our model also allows for the inclusion of starspots. The result of the simulation is a light curve with a planetary transit. White noise may also be added to the light curves to produce curves similar to those obtained by the CoRoT and Kepler space telescopes. The goal is to determine the criteria for detectability of moons and/or ring systems using photometry. The results show that it is possible to detect moons with radii as little as 1.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with CoRoT and 0.3 R{sub Circled-Plus} with Kepler.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/743/1/97},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 743,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Dec 10 00:00:00 EST 2011},
month = {Sat Dec 10 00:00:00 EST 2011}
}
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