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Title: Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

Abstract

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs canmore » be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)
  2. Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21612938
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2011.09.016; PII: S0956-053X(11)00397-7; Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; COST; ERRORS; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; GAS FLOW; INFRARED SPECTRA; LANDFILL GAS; PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SOLID WASTES; SULFUR FLUORIDES; TRACE AMOUNTS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; VOLATILITY; WATER; WATER SATURATION; CHROMATOGRAPHY; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUID FLOW; FLUIDS; FLUORIDES; FLUORINE COMPOUNDS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; MANAGEMENT; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SATURATION; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SPECTRA; SPECTROSCOPY; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR HALIDES; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES

Citation Formats

Jung, Yoojin, Han, Byunghyun, Mostafid, M Erfan, Chiu, Pei, Yazdani, Ramin, and Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.09.016.
Jung, Yoojin, Han, Byunghyun, Mostafid, M Erfan, Chiu, Pei, Yazdani, Ramin, & Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills. United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.09.016.
Jung, Yoojin, Han, Byunghyun, Mostafid, M Erfan, Chiu, Pei, Yazdani, Ramin, and Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu. Wed . "Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills". United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.09.016.
@article{osti_21612938,
title = {Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills},
author = {Jung, Yoojin and Han, Byunghyun and Mostafid, M Erfan and Chiu, Pei and Yazdani, Ramin and Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu},
abstractNote = {Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wasman.2011.09.016},
journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = 2,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {2}
}