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Title: Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions

Abstract

The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21611657
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conference Proceedings; Journal Volume: 1390; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 2. international symposium on negative ions, beams and sources, Takayama City (Japan), 16-19 Nov 2010; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.3637383; (c) 2011 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; A CODES; ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION; ANIONS; ATOMS; COLLISIONS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; ENERGY SPECTRA; EV RANGE; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN IONS; ION SOURCES; IONIZATION; MONTE CARLO METHOD; PLASMA; REFLECTION; SURFACES; TUNGSTEN; CALCULATION METHODS; CHARGED PARTICLES; COMPUTER CODES; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; ENERGY RANGE; IONS; METALS; NONMETALS; REFRACTORY METALS; SIMULATION; SPECTRA; TRANSITION ELEMENTS

Citation Formats

Kenmotsu, Takahiro, and Wada, Motoi. Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3637383.
Kenmotsu, Takahiro, & Wada, Motoi. Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3637383.
Kenmotsu, Takahiro, and Wada, Motoi. Mon . "Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3637383.
@article{osti_21611657,
title = {Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions},
author = {Kenmotsu, Takahiro and Wada, Motoi},
abstractNote = {The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3637383},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1390,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 26 00:00:00 EDT 2011},
month = {Mon Sep 26 00:00:00 EDT 2011}
}
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