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Title: Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems

Abstract

Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Institute of Applied Science, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle 310559, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)
  2. Environmental Impact Training, P.O. Box 9143, Horseshoe Bay, TX 78657 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21590399
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Impact Assessment Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 5; Conference: International Association of Impact Assessment special topic meeting on assessing and managing cumulative environmental effects, Calgary (Canada), 6-9 Nov 2008; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.eiar.2011.01.008; PII: S0195-9255(11)00021-7; Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Journal ID: ISSN 0195-9255
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS; HABITAT; LAWSUITS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu, and Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com. Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2011.01.008.
Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu, & Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com. Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems. United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2011.01.008.
Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu, and Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com. Thu . "Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems". United States. doi:10.1016/j.eiar.2011.01.008.
@article{osti_21590399,
title = {Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems},
author = {Atkinson, Samuel F., E-mail: atkinson@unt.edu and Canter, Larry W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com},
abstractNote = {Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.},
doi = {10.1016/j.eiar.2011.01.008},
journal = {Environmental Impact Assessment Review},
issn = {0195-9255},
number = 5,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}