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Title: Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

Abstract

Purpose: To examine how tumor characteristics and dose affect cataract development after plaque radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and eighty-four patients were diagnosed with uveal melanoma and treated with palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) plaque radiation therapy. Of these, 282 (74%) inclusion met exclusion criteria for follow-up time, tumor location, and phakic status. Then patient-, ophthalmic-, and radiation-specific factors (patient age, diabetes, hypertension, tumor location, tumor dimensions, and lens dose) were examined (by a Cox proportional regression model) as predictors for the development of radiation-related cataract. Results: Radiation cataract developed in 76 (24%) of patients at a mean follow-up of 39.8 months (range, 1-192). Patients with anteriorly located tumors were noted to have a higher incidence of cataract at 43.0% (43 of 100 patients) vs. 18.1% (33 cataracts per 182 patients) for posteriorly located tumors (p <0.0001). However, multivariate Cox proportional modeling showed that increasing patient age at time of treatment (p for trend = 0.0003) and higher lens dose (p for trend = 0.001) were the best predictors (biomarkers) for radiation cataract. Conclusions: Although anterior tumor location, greater tumor height, and increased patient age (at treatment) were associated with significantly greater risk for radiation cataract, dose to lens wasmore » the most significant factor.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [2]
  1. New York Eye Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21587573
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.02.051; PII: S0360-3016(10)00407-4; Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BIOLOGICAL MARKERS; CATARACTS; HAZARDS; HYPERTENSION; MELANOMAS; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; PALLADIUM 103; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CARCINOMAS; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISEASES; DOSES; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; EPITHELIOMAS; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPES; MATHEMATICS; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; NUCLEI; PALLADIUM ISOTOPES; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIOLOGY; SENSE ORGANS DISEASES; STATISTICS; SYMPTOMS; THERAPY; VASCULAR DISEASES

Citation Formats

Finger, Paul T., E-mail: pfinger@eyecancer.com, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, Chin, Kimberly J., Yu Guopei, Patel, Neil S., and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.02.051.
Finger, Paul T., E-mail: pfinger@eyecancer.com, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, Chin, Kimberly J., Yu Guopei, Patel, Neil S., & New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.02.051.
Finger, Paul T., E-mail: pfinger@eyecancer.com, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, Chin, Kimberly J., Yu Guopei, Patel, Neil S., and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY. 2011. "Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.02.051.
@article{osti_21587573,
title = {Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy},
author = {Finger, Paul T., E-mail: pfinger@eyecancer.com and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY and Chin, Kimberly J. and Yu Guopei and Patel, Neil S. and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To examine how tumor characteristics and dose affect cataract development after plaque radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and eighty-four patients were diagnosed with uveal melanoma and treated with palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) plaque radiation therapy. Of these, 282 (74%) inclusion met exclusion criteria for follow-up time, tumor location, and phakic status. Then patient-, ophthalmic-, and radiation-specific factors (patient age, diabetes, hypertension, tumor location, tumor dimensions, and lens dose) were examined (by a Cox proportional regression model) as predictors for the development of radiation-related cataract. Results: Radiation cataract developed in 76 (24%) of patients at a mean follow-up of 39.8 months (range, 1-192). Patients with anteriorly located tumors were noted to have a higher incidence of cataract at 43.0% (43 of 100 patients) vs. 18.1% (33 cataracts per 182 patients) for posteriorly located tumors (p <0.0001). However, multivariate Cox proportional modeling showed that increasing patient age at time of treatment (p for trend = 0.0003) and higher lens dose (p for trend = 0.001) were the best predictors (biomarkers) for radiation cataract. Conclusions: Although anterior tumor location, greater tumor height, and increased patient age (at treatment) were associated with significantly greater risk for radiation cataract, dose to lens was the most significant factor.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.02.051},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate changes in [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) standardized uptake values (SUV) in uveal melanoma before and after plaque brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 217 patients diagnosed with uveal melanoma and eligible for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy underwent preoperative PET/CT to evaluate their intraocular tumor and screen for metastasis. Subsequent to undergoing plaque brachytherapy, patients' PET/CT SUV were periodically reevaluated over 42 months. Results: In this series, 37 (17%) choroidal melanoma patients were found to have an SUV of >2.0. Of these, 18 patients were able to undergo interval follow-up PET/CT scanning. There were 3more » patients with T2, 11 patients with T3, and 4 patients with T4 melanomas according to 7th edition AJCC-UICC criteria. Mean apical thickness was 8.8 mm (range, 3-12.3 mm), and the largest mean tumor diameter was 15.1 mm (range, 12-19.9 mm). The mean initial SUV was 3.7 (range, 2.1-7.3). Patients were followed for a median 16 months (range, 6-42 months). The median time to a tumor SUV of 0 was 8.0 months (range, 6-18 months). There was one case of one interval increase in SUV that diminished after circumferential laser treatment. Conclusions: Intraocular PET/CT imaging provides a physiological assessment of tumor metabolism that can be used to evaluate changes after treatment. In this study, ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy was associated with extinguished tumor PET/CT SUV over time. PET/CT imaging can be used to assess choroidal melanomas for their response to treatment.« less
  • A dosimetry study compared the use of I-125 vs. Pd-103 radioactive seeds for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy. Pd-103 seeds in ophthalmic plaques were used to treat 15 patients with intraocular malignant melanoma. Computer-aided simulations were performed to evaluate the intraocular dose distribution of I-125 versus Pd-103 ophthalmic plaques (delivering equivalent apex doses). Seven target points were selected. Starting at the outer scleral surface, four were located along the central axis of the plaque: the 1 mm point (the inner sclera), the 6 mm point, the tumors apex, and the opposite eye wall. They also evaluated the fovea, optic nerve, and themore » lens because they were considered to be critical structures. These studies demonstrated that the lower energy photons generated by Pd-103 seeds (average 21 KeV) in ophthalmic plaques were more rapidly absorbed in tissue than photons generated by I-125 (average 28 KeV). Therefore, during ophthalmic plaque radiotherapy, Pd-103 photons were found to be more rapidly absorbed within the tumor and less likely to reach most normal ocular structures. On average, the use of Pd-103 decreased the dose to the fovea by 5.7%, to the optic nerve by 8.4%, to the lens by 26%, and to the opposite eye wall by 38.4%. Pd-103 ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy resulted in slightly more irradiation of the tumor and less radiation to most normal ocular structures. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.« less
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence, the clinical risk factors, and the dose-volume relationship of radiation-induced rib fracture (RIRF) after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred sixteen patients treated with SBRT for primary or metastatic lung cancer at our institution, with at least 6 months of follow-up and no previous overlapping radiation exposure, were included in this study. To determine the clinical risk factors associated with RIRF, correlations between the incidence of RIRF and the variables, including age, sex, diagnosis, gross tumor volume diameter, rib-tumor distance, and use of steroidmore » administration, were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was also conducted. Regarding the maximum dose, V10, V20, V30, and V40 of the rib, and the incidences of RIRF were compared between the two groups divided by the cutoff value determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: One hundred sixteen patients and 374 ribs met the inclusion criteria. Among the 116 patients, 28 patients (46 ribs) experienced RIRF. The estimated incidence of rib fracture was 37.7% at 3 years. Limited distance from the rib to the tumor (<2.0 cm) was the only significant risk factor for RIRF (p = 0.0001). Among the dosimetric parameters used for receiver operating characteristic analysis, the maximum dose showed the highest area under the curve. The 3-year estimated risk of RIRF and the determined cutoff value were 45.8% vs. 1.4% (maximum dose, {>=}42.4 Gy or less), 51.6% vs. 2.0% (V40, {>=}0.29 cm{sup 3} or less), 45.8% vs. 2.2% (V30, {>=}1.35 cm{sup 3} or less), 42.0% vs. 8.5% (V20, {>=}3.62 cm{sup 3} or less), or 25.9% vs. 10.5% (V10, {>=}5.03 cm{sup 3} or less). Conclusions: The incidence of RIRF after hypofractionated SBRT is relatively high. The maximum dose and high-dose volume are strongly correlated with RIRF.« less
  • Purpose: To report on the risk of radiation maculopathy for iris and iridociliary melanomas treated by {sup 103}Pd plaque radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective clinical case series of 30 eyes in 30 patients with melanomas limited to the iris or invading the ciliary body. The main outcome measures included demographic information, laterality, tumor size, location, visual acuity, radiation dose, local control, retinal evaluation, and duration of follow-up. Results: Thirty patients were followed for a median 36 months (range, 12-90 months). Sixteen of 30 tumors (53%) were pure iris melanomas, and 14 (47%) were primary iris melanomas extendingmore » into the ciliary body. Radiation dosimetry showed that the median tumor apex dose was 85 Gy (range, 75-100 Gy), lens dose 43.5 Gy (range, 17.8-60 Gy), fovea dose 1.8 Gy (range, 1.3-5 Gy), and central optic disc dose 1.7 Gy (range, 1.3-4.7 Gy). Cataracts developed in 20 of the 28 phakic eyes (71.4%). No patient in this series developed radiation maculopathy or radiation optic neuropathy. Last best-corrected visual acuity was {>=}20/25 in 28 patients (93%) at a median 36 months' follow-up. Conclusion: Though visual acuities were transiently affected by radiation cataract, no radiation maculopathy or optic neuropathy has been noted after {sup 103}Pd treatment of iris and iridociliary melanomas.« less
  • Purpose: To determine whether the computed dosimetry of a new ophthalmic plaque, EP917, when compared with the standard Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) plaques, could reduce radiation exposure to vision critical structures of the eye. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients with uveal melanoma treated with COMS radiation plaques between 2007 and 2010 were included in this study. These treatment plans were generated with the use of Bebig Plaque Simulator treatment-planning software, both for COMS plaques and for EP917 plaques using I-125. Dose distributions were calculated for a prescription of 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Doses to themore » optic disc, opposite retina, lens, and macula were obtained, and differences between the 2 groups were analyzed by standard parametric methods. Results: When compared with the COMS plaques, the EP917 plaques used fewer radiation seeds by an average difference of 1.94 (P<.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to -1.06) and required less total strength of radiation sources by an average of 17.74 U (air kerma units) (P<.001; 95% CI, -20.16 to -15.32). The total radiation doses delivered to the optic disc, opposite retina, and macula were significantly less by 4.57 Gy, 0.50 Gy, and 11.18 Gy, respectively, with the EP917 plaques vs the COMS plaques. Conclusion: EP917 plaques deliver less overall radiation exposure to critical vision structures than COMS treatment plaques while still delivering the same total therapeutic dose to the tumor.« less