skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS

Abstract

Recent studies of the tight scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies have suggested that in the past BHs constituted a larger fraction of their host galaxies' mass. However, these arguments are limited by selection effects and difficulties in determining robust host galaxy masses at high redshifts. Here we report the first results of a new, complementary diagnostic route: we directly determine a dynamical host galaxy mass for the z = 1.3 luminous quasar J090543.56+043347.3 through high spatial resolution (0.''47, 4 kpc FWHM) observations of the host galaxy gas kinematics over 30 x 40 kpc using the European Southern Observatory/Very Large Telescope/SINFONI with laser guide star adaptive optics. Combining our result of M{sub dyn} = 2.05{sup +1.68}{sub -0.74} x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (within a radius 5.25 {+-} 1.05 kpc) with M{sub BH,MgII} = 9.02 {+-} 1.43 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, M{sub BH,H{alpha}} = 2.83{sup +1.93}{sub -1.13} x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, we find that the ratio of BH mass to host galaxy dynamical mass for J090543.56+043347.3 matches the present-day relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}, well within the IR scatter, and deviating at most by a factor of two frommore » the mean. J090543.56+043347.3 displays clear signs of an ongoing tidal interaction and of spatially extended star formation at a rate of 50-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, above the cosmic average for a galaxy of this mass and redshift. We argue that its subsequent evolution may move J090543.56+043347.3 even closer to the z = 0 relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}. Our results support the picture in which any substantive evolution in these relations must occur prior to z {approx} 1.3. Having demonstrated the power of this modeling approach, we are currently analyzing similar data on seven further objects to better constrain such evolution.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21587461
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 739; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/739/2/90; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; BLACK HOLES; EMISSION; GALAXIES; MASS; QUASARS; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; COSMIC RADIO SOURCES; RESOLUTION

Citation Formats

Inskip, K. J., Jahnke, K., Rix, H.-W., and Van de Ven, G., E-mail: inskip@mpia.de. RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/739/2/90; COUNTRY OF INPUT: INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA).
Inskip, K. J., Jahnke, K., Rix, H.-W., & Van de Ven, G., E-mail: inskip@mpia.de. RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/739/2/90; COUNTRY OF INPUT: INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA).
Inskip, K. J., Jahnke, K., Rix, H.-W., and Van de Ven, G., E-mail: inskip@mpia.de. 2011. "RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/739/2/90; COUNTRY OF INPUT: INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA).
@article{osti_21587461,
title = {RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS},
author = {Inskip, K. J. and Jahnke, K. and Rix, H.-W. and Van de Ven, G., E-mail: inskip@mpia.de},
abstractNote = {Recent studies of the tight scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies have suggested that in the past BHs constituted a larger fraction of their host galaxies' mass. However, these arguments are limited by selection effects and difficulties in determining robust host galaxy masses at high redshifts. Here we report the first results of a new, complementary diagnostic route: we directly determine a dynamical host galaxy mass for the z = 1.3 luminous quasar J090543.56+043347.3 through high spatial resolution (0.''47, 4 kpc FWHM) observations of the host galaxy gas kinematics over 30 x 40 kpc using the European Southern Observatory/Very Large Telescope/SINFONI with laser guide star adaptive optics. Combining our result of M{sub dyn} = 2.05{sup +1.68}{sub -0.74} x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (within a radius 5.25 {+-} 1.05 kpc) with M{sub BH,MgII} = 9.02 {+-} 1.43 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, M{sub BH,H{alpha}} = 2.83{sup +1.93}{sub -1.13} x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, we find that the ratio of BH mass to host galaxy dynamical mass for J090543.56+043347.3 matches the present-day relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}, well within the IR scatter, and deviating at most by a factor of two from the mean. J090543.56+043347.3 displays clear signs of an ongoing tidal interaction and of spatially extended star formation at a rate of 50-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, above the cosmic average for a galaxy of this mass and redshift. We argue that its subsequent evolution may move J090543.56+043347.3 even closer to the z = 0 relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}. Our results support the picture in which any substantive evolution in these relations must occur prior to z {approx} 1.3. Having demonstrated the power of this modeling approach, we are currently analyzing similar data on seven further objects to better constrain such evolution.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/739/2/90; COUNTRY OF INPUT: INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA)},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 739,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month =
}
  • The dynamical and physical processes in the ISM around a QSO have been calculated in order to understand the effects of QSO radiation on the host galaxy. Numerical hydrodynamical solutions for one- and two-dimensional cases are found through a MacCormack differencing scheme. Ion-field emission, ion sputtering, charge equilibrium, thermal equilibrium, coupling between gas ions and dust grains, photoionization, and photoelectrical processes are considered. The results show that dust grains play an important role in determining the dynamics of the ISM around a QSO. Inside 7 kpc, all dust grains are destroyed in about 30 million yr. Gas goes to largemore » distances in the galactic plane and leaves the galaxy. 29 references.« less
  • Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of redshifted [O III], Hβ, and optical continuum emission from the z = 3.8 radio galaxy 4C+41.17 is presented, obtained with the laser-guide-star adaptive optics facility on the Gemini North telescope. Employing a specialized dithering technique, a spatial resolution of 0.''10, or 0.7 kpc, is achieved in each spectral element, with a velocity resolution of ∼70 km s{sup –1}. Spectra similar to local starbursts are found for bright knots coincident in archival Hubble Space Telescope ( HST) rest-frame ultraviolet images, which also allows a key line diagnostic to be mapped together with new kinematic information. There emergesmore » a clearer picture of the nebular emission associated with the jet in 8.3 GHz and 15 GHz Very Large Array maps, closely tied to a Lyα-bright shell-shaped structure seen with HST. This supports a previous interpretation of that arc tracing a bow shock, inducing ∼10{sup 10–11} M {sub ☉} star formation regions that comprise the clumpy broadband optical/ultraviolet morphology near the core.« less
  • Highly unequal-mass ratio binaries are rare among field brown dwarfs, with the mass ratio distribution of the known census described by q {sup (4.9{+-}0.7)}. However, such systems enable a unique test of the joint accuracy of evolutionary and atmospheric models, under the constraint of coevality for the individual components (the 'isochrone test'). We carry out this test using two of the most extreme field substellar binaries currently known, the T1 + T6 {epsilon} Ind Bab binary and a newly discovered 0.''14 T2.0 + T7.5 binary, 2MASS J12095613-1004008AB, identified with Keck laser guide star adaptive optics. The latter is the mostmore » extreme tight binary resolved to date (q {approx} 0.5). Based on the locations of the binary components on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, current models successfully indicate that these two systems are coeval, with internal age differences of log(age) = -0.8 {+-} 1.3(-1.0{sup +1.2}{sub -1.3}) dex and 0.5{sup +0.4}{sub -0.3}(0.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4}) dex for 2MASS J1209-1004AB and {epsilon} Ind Bab, respectively, as inferred from the Lyon (Tucson) models. However, the total mass of {epsilon} Ind Bab derived from the H-R diagram ({approx} 80 M{sub Jup} using the Lyon models) is strongly discrepant with the reported dynamical mass. This problem, which is independent of the assumed age of the {epsilon} Ind Bab system, can be explained by a {approx} 50-100 K systematic error in the model atmosphere fitting, indicating slightly warmer temperatures for both components; bringing the mass determinations from the H-R diagram and the visual orbit into consistency leads to an inferred age of {approx} 6 Gyr for {epsilon} Ind Bab, older than previously assumed. Overall, the two T dwarf binaries studied here, along with recent results from T dwarfs in age and mass benchmark systems, yield evidence for small ({approx}100 K) errors in the evolutionary models and/or model atmospheres, but not significantly larger. Future parallax, resolved spectroscopy, and dynamical mass measurements for 2MASS J1209-1004AB will enable a more stringent application of the isochrone test. Finally, the binary nature of this object reduces its utility as the primary T3 near-IR spectral typing standard; we suggest SDSS J1206+2813 as a replacement.« less
  • NGC 6240 is a pair of colliding disk galaxies, each with a black hole in its core. We have used laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope to obtain high-resolution ({approx}0.''06) near-infrared integral-field spectra of the region surrounding the supermassive black hole in the south nucleus of this galaxy merger. We use the K-band CO absorption bandheads to trace stellar kinematics. We obtain a spatial resolution of about 20 pc and thus directly resolve the sphere of gravitational influence of the massive black hole. We explore two different methods to measure the black hole mass. Using amore » Jeans Axisymmetric Multi-Gaussian mass model, we investigate the limit that a relaxed mass distribution produces all of the measured velocity dispersion, and find an upper limit on the black hole mass at 2.0 {+-} 0.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. When assuming the young stars whose spectra we observe remain in a thin disk, we compare Keplerian velocity fields to the measured two-dimensional velocity field and fit for a mass profile containing a black hole point mass plus a radially varying spherical component, which suggests a lower limit for the black hole mass of 8.7 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. Our measurements of the stellar velocity dispersion place this active galactic nucleus within the scatter of the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. As NGC 6240 is a merging system, this may indicate that the relation is preserved during a merger at least until the final coalescence of the two nuclei.« less
  • We report the first detection of the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster-a young ({approx}2 Myr), massive (10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }) starburst cluster located only 26 pc in projection from the Galactic center. This was accomplished using proper motion measurements within the central 10'' Multiplication-Sign 10'' of the cluster, obtained with the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Keck Observatory over a three-year time baseline (2006-2009). This uniform data set results in proper motion measurements that are improved by a factor {approx}5 over previous measurements from heterogeneous instruments. By careful, simultaneous accounting of the cluster and fieldmore » contaminant distributions as well as the possible sources of measurement uncertainties, we estimate the internal velocity dispersion to be 0.15 {+-} 0.01 mas yr{sup -1}, which corresponds to 5.4 {+-} 0.4 km s{sup -1} at a distance of 8.4 kpc. Projecting a simple model for the cluster onto the sky to compare with our proper motion data set, in conjunction with surface density data, we estimate the total present-day mass of the cluster to be M(r < 1.0 pc) = 1.5{sup +0.74}{sub -0.60} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The mass in stars observed within a cylinder of radius R (for comparison to photometric estimates) is found to be M(R < 0.4 pc) = 0.90{sup +0.40}{sub -0.35} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} at formal 3{sigma} confidence. This mass measurement is free from assumptions about the mass function of the cluster, and thus may be used to check mass estimates from photometry and simulation. Photometric mass estimates assuming an initially Salpeter mass function ({Gamma}{sub 0} = 1.35, or {Gamma} {approx} 1.0 at present, where dN/d(log M){proportional_to}M{sup {Gamma}}) suggest a total cluster mass M{sub cl} {approx} (4-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and projected mass ({approx} 2 {<=} M(R < 0.4 pc) {<=} 3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. Photometric mass estimates assuming a globally top-heavy or strongly truncated present-day mass function (PDMF; with {Gamma} {approx} 0.6) yield mass estimates closer to M(R < 0.4 pc) {approx} 1-1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. Consequently, our results support a PDMF that is either top-heavy or truncated at low mass, or both. Collateral benefits of our data and analysis include: (1) cluster membership probabilities, which may be used to extract a clean-cluster sample for future photometric work; (2) a refined estimate of the bulk motion of the Arches cluster with respect to the field, which we find to be 172 {+-} 15 km s{sup -1}, which is slightly slower than suggested by previous measurements using one epoch each with the Very Large Telescope and the Keck telescope; and (3) a velocity dispersion estimate for the field itself, which is likely dominated by the inner Galactic bulge and the nuclear disk.« less