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Title: PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS

Abstract

Massive planetary cores ({approx}10 Earth masses) trigger rapid gas accretion to form gas giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. We investigate the core growth and the possibilities for cores to reach such a critical core mass. At the late stage, planetary cores grow through collisions with small planetesimals. Collisional fragmentation of planetesimals, which is induced by gravitational interaction with planetary cores, reduces the amount of planetesimals surrounding them, and thus the final core masses. Starting from small planetesimals that the fragmentation rapidly removes, less massive cores are formed. However, planetary cores acquire atmospheres that enlarge their collisional cross section before rapid gas accretion. Once planetary cores exceed about Mars mass, atmospheres significantly accelerate the growth of cores. We show that, taking into account the effects of fragmentation and atmosphere, initially large planetesimals enable formation of sufficiently massive cores. On the other hand, because the growth of cores is slow for large planetesimals, a massive disk is necessary for cores to grow enough within a disk lifetime. If the disk with 100 km sized initial planetesimals is 10 times as massive as the minimum mass solar nebula, planetary cores can exceed 10 Earth masses in the Jovian planet region (>5more » AU).« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Astrophysical Institute and University Observatory, Friedrich Schiller University, Schillergaesschen 2-3, 07745 Jena (Germany)
  2. Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-Ku Kita 19 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21582964
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 738; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/738/1/35
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; COLLISIONS; FRAGMENTATION; GRAVITATIONAL INTERACTIONS; MASS; PLANETS; BASIC INTERACTIONS; INTERACTIONS

Citation Formats

Kobayashi, Hiroshi, Krivov, Alexander V., and Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: hkobayas@astro.uni-jena.de. PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/738/1/35.
Kobayashi, Hiroshi, Krivov, Alexander V., & Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: hkobayas@astro.uni-jena.de. PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/738/1/35.
Kobayashi, Hiroshi, Krivov, Alexander V., and Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: hkobayas@astro.uni-jena.de. 2011. "PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/738/1/35.
@article{osti_21582964,
title = {PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS},
author = {Kobayashi, Hiroshi and Krivov, Alexander V. and Tanaka, Hidekazu, E-mail: hkobayas@astro.uni-jena.de},
abstractNote = {Massive planetary cores ({approx}10 Earth masses) trigger rapid gas accretion to form gas giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. We investigate the core growth and the possibilities for cores to reach such a critical core mass. At the late stage, planetary cores grow through collisions with small planetesimals. Collisional fragmentation of planetesimals, which is induced by gravitational interaction with planetary cores, reduces the amount of planetesimals surrounding them, and thus the final core masses. Starting from small planetesimals that the fragmentation rapidly removes, less massive cores are formed. However, planetary cores acquire atmospheres that enlarge their collisional cross section before rapid gas accretion. Once planetary cores exceed about Mars mass, atmospheres significantly accelerate the growth of cores. We show that, taking into account the effects of fragmentation and atmosphere, initially large planetesimals enable formation of sufficiently massive cores. On the other hand, because the growth of cores is slow for large planetesimals, a massive disk is necessary for cores to grow enough within a disk lifetime. If the disk with 100 km sized initial planetesimals is 10 times as massive as the minimum mass solar nebula, planetary cores can exceed 10 Earth masses in the Jovian planet region (>5 AU).},
doi = {10.1088/0004-637X/738/1/35},
journal = {Astrophysical Journal},
number = 1,
volume = 738,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 9
}
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