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Title: ExploreNEOs. V. AVERAGE ALBEDO BY TAXONOMIC COMPLEX IN THE NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID POPULATION

Abstract

Examining the albedo distribution of the near-Earth object (NEO) population allows for a better understanding of the relationship between absolute (H) magnitude and size, which impacts calculations of the size frequency distribution and impact hazards. Examining NEO albedos also sheds light on the differences between the NEO and Main Belt populations. We combine albedo results from the ExploreNEOs Warm Spitzer Exploration Science program with taxonomic classifications from the literature, publicly available data sets, and new observations from our concurrent spectral survey to derive the average albedos for C-, D-, Q-, S-, V-, and X-complex NEOs. Using a sample size of 118 NEOs, we calculate average albedos of 0.29{sup +0.05}{sub -0.04}, 0.26{sup +0.04}{sub -0.03}, and 0.42{sup +0.13}{sub -0.11} for the Q-, S-, and V-complexes, respectively. The averages for the C- and D-complexes are 0.13{sup +0.06}{sub -0.05} and 0.02{sup +0.02}{sub -0.01}, but these averages are based on a small number of objects (five and two, respectively) and will improve with additional observations. We use albedos to assign X-complex asteroids to one of the E-, M-, or P-types. Our results demonstrate that the average albedos for the C-, S-, V-, and X-complexes are higher for NEOs than the corresponding averages observed in themore » Main Belt.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]; ; ;  [3]; ; ; ;  [4]; ; ;  [5];  [6];  [7]; ;  [8];  [9];  [10]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)
  2. Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, 1412 Circle Dr., Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)
  3. Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote dAzur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)
  4. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-65 Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)
  5. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)
  6. Joint Sciences Department, Claremont McKenna, Pitzer, and Scripps Colleges, 925 North Mills Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States)
  7. Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)
  8. DLR Institute of Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)
  9. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pomona College, 610 N. College Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States)
  10. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21582904
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Astronomical Journal (New York, N.Y. Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 142; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-3881
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ALBEDO; ASTEROIDS; ASTROPHYSICS; CLASSIFICATION; PLANETS; PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Thomas, C. A., Trilling, D. E., Emery, J. P., Mueller, M., Delbo, M., Morbidelli, A., Hora, J. L., Fazio, G., Smith, H. A., Spahr, T. B., Benner, L. A. M., Chesley, S., Mainzer, A., Bhattacharya, B., Bottke, W. F., Harris, A. W., Mommert, M., Penprase, B., and Stansberry, J. A., E-mail: cristina.thomas@nau.edu. ExploreNEOs. V. AVERAGE ALBEDO BY TAXONOMIC COMPLEX IN THE NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID POPULATION. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85.
Thomas, C. A., Trilling, D. E., Emery, J. P., Mueller, M., Delbo, M., Morbidelli, A., Hora, J. L., Fazio, G., Smith, H. A., Spahr, T. B., Benner, L. A. M., Chesley, S., Mainzer, A., Bhattacharya, B., Bottke, W. F., Harris, A. W., Mommert, M., Penprase, B., & Stansberry, J. A., E-mail: cristina.thomas@nau.edu. ExploreNEOs. V. AVERAGE ALBEDO BY TAXONOMIC COMPLEX IN THE NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID POPULATION. United States. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85.
Thomas, C. A., Trilling, D. E., Emery, J. P., Mueller, M., Delbo, M., Morbidelli, A., Hora, J. L., Fazio, G., Smith, H. A., Spahr, T. B., Benner, L. A. M., Chesley, S., Mainzer, A., Bhattacharya, B., Bottke, W. F., Harris, A. W., Mommert, M., Penprase, B., and Stansberry, J. A., E-mail: cristina.thomas@nau.edu. Thu . "ExploreNEOs. V. AVERAGE ALBEDO BY TAXONOMIC COMPLEX IN THE NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID POPULATION". United States. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85.
@article{osti_21582904,
title = {ExploreNEOs. V. AVERAGE ALBEDO BY TAXONOMIC COMPLEX IN THE NEAR-EARTH ASTEROID POPULATION},
author = {Thomas, C. A. and Trilling, D. E. and Emery, J. P. and Mueller, M. and Delbo, M. and Morbidelli, A. and Hora, J. L. and Fazio, G. and Smith, H. A. and Spahr, T. B. and Benner, L. A. M. and Chesley, S. and Mainzer, A. and Bhattacharya, B. and Bottke, W. F. and Harris, A. W. and Mommert, M. and Penprase, B. and Stansberry, J. A., E-mail: cristina.thomas@nau.edu},
abstractNote = {Examining the albedo distribution of the near-Earth object (NEO) population allows for a better understanding of the relationship between absolute (H) magnitude and size, which impacts calculations of the size frequency distribution and impact hazards. Examining NEO albedos also sheds light on the differences between the NEO and Main Belt populations. We combine albedo results from the ExploreNEOs Warm Spitzer Exploration Science program with taxonomic classifications from the literature, publicly available data sets, and new observations from our concurrent spectral survey to derive the average albedos for C-, D-, Q-, S-, V-, and X-complex NEOs. Using a sample size of 118 NEOs, we calculate average albedos of 0.29{sup +0.05}{sub -0.04}, 0.26{sup +0.04}{sub -0.03}, and 0.42{sup +0.13}{sub -0.11} for the Q-, S-, and V-complexes, respectively. The averages for the C- and D-complexes are 0.13{sup +0.06}{sub -0.05} and 0.02{sup +0.02}{sub -0.01}, but these averages are based on a small number of objects (five and two, respectively) and will improve with additional observations. We use albedos to assign X-complex asteroids to one of the E-, M-, or P-types. Our results demonstrate that the average albedos for the C-, S-, V-, and X-complexes are higher for NEOs than the corresponding averages observed in the Main Belt.},
doi = {10.1088/0004-6256/142/3/85},
journal = {Astronomical Journal (New York, N.Y. Online)},
issn = {1538-3881},
number = 3,
volume = 142,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}