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Title: A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources

Abstract

Highlights: > End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) as secondary metal resources. > The content and the total amount of metals in specific equipment are both important. > We categorized 21 EEE types from contents and total amounts of various metals. > Important equipment types as secondary resources were listed for each metal kind. > Collectability and possible collection systems of various EEE types were discussed. - Abstract: End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones,more » and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods were suggested for equipment types that currently have no specific collection systems in Japan, particularly for video games, notebook computers, and mid-size ICT and audio/video equipment.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ;  [1];  [3]
  1. Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2, Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan)
  2. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)
  3. Graduate School of Environment and Information Science, Yokohama National University, 79-7 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21578477
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 9-10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.009; PII: S0956-053X(11)00251-0; Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR CONDITIONERS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; JAPAN; METALS; PERSONAL COMPUTERS; REFRIGERATORS; RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT; ASIA; COMPUTERS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DIGITAL COMPUTERS; ELEMENTS; EQUIPMENT; MICROCOMPUTERS

Citation Formats

Oguchi, Masahiro, E-mail: oguchi.masahiro@nies.go.jp, Murakami, Shinsuke, Sakanakura, Hirofumi, Kida, Akiko, and Kameya, Takashi. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.009.
Oguchi, Masahiro, E-mail: oguchi.masahiro@nies.go.jp, Murakami, Shinsuke, Sakanakura, Hirofumi, Kida, Akiko, & Kameya, Takashi. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources. United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.009.
Oguchi, Masahiro, E-mail: oguchi.masahiro@nies.go.jp, Murakami, Shinsuke, Sakanakura, Hirofumi, Kida, Akiko, and Kameya, Takashi. Thu . "A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources". United States. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.009.
@article{osti_21578477,
title = {A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources},
author = {Oguchi, Masahiro, E-mail: oguchi.masahiro@nies.go.jp and Murakami, Shinsuke and Sakanakura, Hirofumi and Kida, Akiko and Kameya, Takashi},
abstractNote = {Highlights: > End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) as secondary metal resources. > The content and the total amount of metals in specific equipment are both important. > We categorized 21 EEE types from contents and total amounts of various metals. > Important equipment types as secondary resources were listed for each metal kind. > Collectability and possible collection systems of various EEE types were discussed. - Abstract: End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods were suggested for equipment types that currently have no specific collection systems in Japan, particularly for video games, notebook computers, and mid-size ICT and audio/video equipment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.009},
journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = 9-10,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}