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Title: Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region

Abstract

Highlights: > Previous research indicates that targeted strategies designed for specific areas should lead to improved diversion. > Survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting. > Then logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific management intervention strategies. > Waste management initiatives can be tailored to specific needs of areas rather than one size fits all means currently used. - Abstract: Urgent transformation is required in Ireland to divert biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill and prevent increases in overall waste generation. When BMW is optimally managed, it becomes a resource with value instead of an unwanted by-product requiring disposal. An analysis of survey responses from commercial and residential sectors for the Dublin region in previous research by the authors proved that attitudes towards and behaviour regarding municipal solid waste is spatially variable. This finding indicates that targeted intervention strategies designed for specific geographic areas should lead to improved diversion rates of BMW from landfill, a requirement of the Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC. In the research described in this paper, survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting, after which logic modelling and behaviouralmore » research were employed to develop site-specific waste management intervention strategies. The main strategies devised include (a) roll out of the Brown Bin (Organics) Collection and Community Workshops in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown, (b) initiation of a Community Composting Project in Dublin City (c) implementation of a Waste Promotion and Motivation Scheme in South Dublin (d) development and distribution of a Waste Booklet to promote waste reduction activities in Fingal (e) region wide distribution of a Waste Booklet to the commercial sector and (f) Greening Irish Pubs Initiative. Each of these strategies was devised after interviews with both the residential and commercial sectors to help make optimal waste management the norm for both sectors. Strategy (b), (e) and (f) are detailed in this paper. By integrating a human element into accepted waste management approaches, these strategies will make optimal waste behaviour easier to achieve. Ultimately this will help divert waste from landfill and improve waste management practice as a whole for the region. This method of devising targeted intervention strategies can be adapted for many other regions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Green Campus Facilitator, Cork Institute of Technology, Bishopstown, Cork (Ireland)
  2. Centre for Water Resources Research, School of Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Newstead, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
21578464
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Waste Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 9-10; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.008; PII: S0956-053X(11)00250-9; Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Journal ID: ISSN 0956-053X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES; ATTITUDES; BY-PRODUCTS; COMMERCIAL SECTOR; COMMUNITIES; COMPOSTING; FORECASTING; HUMAN FACTORS; IMPLEMENTATION; IRELAND; MUNICIPAL WASTES; ORGANIC WASTES; RESIDENTIAL SECTOR; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SIMULATION; SOLID WASTES; URBAN AREAS; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; EUROPE; MANAGEMENT; PROCESSING; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES; WESTERN EUROPE

Citation Formats

Purcell, M, Centre for Water Resources Research, School of Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Newstead, Belfield, Dublin 4, and Magette, W L. Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.008.
Purcell, M, Centre for Water Resources Research, School of Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Newstead, Belfield, Dublin 4, & Magette, W L. Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.008
Purcell, M, Centre for Water Resources Research, School of Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Newstead, Belfield, Dublin 4, and Magette, W L. Thu . "Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.008.
@article{osti_21578464,
title = {Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region},
author = {Purcell, M and Centre for Water Resources Research, School of Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Newstead, Belfield, Dublin 4 and Magette, W L},
abstractNote = {Highlights: > Previous research indicates that targeted strategies designed for specific areas should lead to improved diversion. > Survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting. > Then logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific management intervention strategies. > Waste management initiatives can be tailored to specific needs of areas rather than one size fits all means currently used. - Abstract: Urgent transformation is required in Ireland to divert biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill and prevent increases in overall waste generation. When BMW is optimally managed, it becomes a resource with value instead of an unwanted by-product requiring disposal. An analysis of survey responses from commercial and residential sectors for the Dublin region in previous research by the authors proved that attitudes towards and behaviour regarding municipal solid waste is spatially variable. This finding indicates that targeted intervention strategies designed for specific geographic areas should lead to improved diversion rates of BMW from landfill, a requirement of the Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC. In the research described in this paper, survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting, after which logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific waste management intervention strategies. The main strategies devised include (a) roll out of the Brown Bin (Organics) Collection and Community Workshops in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown, (b) initiation of a Community Composting Project in Dublin City (c) implementation of a Waste Promotion and Motivation Scheme in South Dublin (d) development and distribution of a Waste Booklet to promote waste reduction activities in Fingal (e) region wide distribution of a Waste Booklet to the commercial sector and (f) Greening Irish Pubs Initiative. Each of these strategies was devised after interviews with both the residential and commercial sectors to help make optimal waste management the norm for both sectors. Strategy (b), (e) and (f) are detailed in this paper. By integrating a human element into accepted waste management approaches, these strategies will make optimal waste behaviour easier to achieve. Ultimately this will help divert waste from landfill and improve waste management practice as a whole for the region. This method of devising targeted intervention strategies can be adapted for many other regions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.wasman.2011.05.008},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/21578464}, journal = {Waste Management},
issn = {0956-053X},
number = 9-10,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}